Author Kadee Cader Shares About Here Be Dragons and Giveaways

My final interview for 2017 is with Clean Reads author Kadee Carder. I hope you find our conversation as interesting and fun as I did. Read to the bottom for her varied giveaways. Kadee, welcome to Jubilee Writer. I must say even your title Here Be Dragons sounds fun. Tell us about this new release.

 

HereBeDragons_1400HERE BE DRAGONS: A YA Sci Fi Action/Adventure!

Alliance Military Guard sent the order. Sergeant Tucker Thompson acquiesced. Hopping a plane to his long-lost Australian birthplace, he’s been charged with his toughest mission yet. Thompson must rally his company of soldiers to prevent a new generation of weaponry from breaching the world’s borders.

 

Pound the war drums. Rattle the cages. HERE BE DRAGONS.

 

How did you do research to create this fantasy world?

I spent countless hours doing research! From military drills, to hand-to-hand combat techniques, to the weather in Australia in the summer, it’s all part of making the book realistic! For information, I often used YouTube because you can find a video for almost anything. For places, I included YouTube, watching others’ vacation videos and adventures, and then I also used Google Earth, Street View. I walked streets and explore. I opened up our Virtual Reality kit and use the Google Earth app to explore the earth and walk where my characters roam. Then I also consider living itself is research. How does the skin intercept flowers, or coffee, or gravel on the road? What are the essences of life? Those small moments of coffee on the back porch on a rainy day are perfect stock for my arsenal of imagery.

What inspired you to write your book?

My preacher recently introduced the idea that people who do not know God are simply prisoners of war. What better way to free prisoners than by love? What better way to fight darkness than with light? Do we work on earth to accomplish material things or do we share encouragement, love, inspiration, and good works in the name of someone much greater than ourselves? Do we humbly help and teach? We humans aren’t just here on this planet to make money or fill time. We are here for life, and a life full. God put each of us here, doing good work he created long ago for us to do. We don’t do any of it for our glory or success, but to free the prisoners of war. As Tucker states in the crux: Life isn’t just a thing. Life is the thing.

 

I love the concept. I have found inspiration from sermons as well. But you’ve really taken a wonderful concept and given your readers a deep truth to explore in an interesting setting.

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Now, let’s explore a little about you. I always like to ask authors what is a favorite verse that resonates with them?

Three verses continue fueling me even when I consider giving up and giving in:

For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power, love, and a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

In the strength of the Lord, I can do all things. Philippians 4:13

For we are God’s handiwork, created to do good works, which he prepared in advance for us to do. Ephesians 2:10

Combining all three, one can come back to the ultimate purpose for giving best efforts and working with joy and gratitude. Even the difficult tasks can be taken in stride because God’s prepared them specifically for us to do, for our greater purpose.

Challenges become opportunities. Rain becomes refreshing. Walls become training moments. And we can continue along this twisty road because God journeys along at our sides and within our spirits. We’ve only got to keep on walking.

 

Very inspiring, Kadee. Now, as a fantasy writer I think you will appreciate my next question. If you could go back in time and give one piece of advice for your younger self about writing what would that be?

Give it ten years. Realize that your best ability will be to consider challenges as opportunities for improvement. Grow to love the heavy lifting of weight, and continue working to improve—and give it a solid ten years of work before you give up. Persistence. Consistency. Moxie.

The concept of giving the writing life time resonates with me. I’m sure my readers can relate as well.

 

Kadee, describe yourself and your goals as a writer. And tell us a bit about your books in print.

Fierce yet sparkly, I help seekers find brave new worlds. The goal is magic, the medium is ink, and the fuel is coffee. And sometimes pizza. I teach English on the university level when I’m not dancing around the living room with my family, lifting heavy at the gym, traveling the planet, or binging superhero shows.

 

The INSURRECTION trilogy, HERE BE DRAGONS, and non-fiction inspirational IGNITE roll out perilous motives, twisty plots, and daring protagonists. Grab some real estate and your copy of my latest adventure, and follow along at KadeeCarder.com.

Tell us more about Here Be Dragons and the unusual give-away you have for the release of Here Be Dragons.

 

FUN FACT NUMBER ONE:

Here Be Dragons is a standalone novel, but it does follow my Insurrection trilogy. We see a few characters we met on those luxurious Caribbean beaches. Tucker was the romantic interest from the trilogy. After writing the trilogy, I felt like readers needed to know Tucker more, and he had to complete this assignment. Might as well follow along! No need to have read the trilogy; this book records its own wild adventure!

FUN FACT NUMBER TWO:

PRE-ORDER GIFT WITH PURCHASE! 10 FREE WORKOUTS!

With over ten years of experience specializing in metabolic conditioning, and as the official trainer of the Alliance Military Guard, Fit By Faith© owner Krista Johnson has created ten workouts to get you in gear and ready to crush life. Utilizing a variety of whole-body strengthening techniques, your FREE WORKOUTS will be just what you needed to start your new year off the right way. Each of the ten workouts can be completed at home or in a gym, and takes approximately thirty minutes or less.

Submit your pre-order receipt to KadeeCarder.com/HereBeDragons and receive your own Alliance Military Guard Training Guide containing TWO WEEKS worth of exercises, guaranteed to get you in battle-ready shape to train as a Guardsman.

This gift with purchase will ONLY be available on pre-orders! Offer expires January 1st, 2018 at 11:59 PM Central time.

 

Purchase Here Be Dragons on kindle unlimited for only $4.99:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0787PKJJF/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1513231085&sr=8-1&keywords=kadee+carder+here+be+dragons

 

Here Be Dragons releases January 2, 2018

 

Contact Kadee Carder and discover more giveaways

Visit http://www.kadeecarder.com for inspiration, radio interviews, gift certificates, freebie codes, and more!

Let’s connect on social media!

Website: kadeecarder.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kadeecarderink/

Instagram: kadeecarderink

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAkYQcShpWHBua-7VVi9Swg

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/kadeecarder/

Twitter: @kadeecarderink

And please feel free to subscribe for encouraging blogs! Kadeecarder.com

I’m giving away a free, empowering e-book to those who subscribe to my email list at kadeecarder.com. Titled IGNITE, the 60-page book offers a serving of inspiration, a dash of hope, and a cup of grace to help you get kickin’ on those challenging tasks you’ve got to do!

Kadee, all these giveaways exemplify your desire to help others grow in grace and be there best self.

Readers, here’s your chance to get some fun gifts for yourself to kick start 2018 in a positive way.

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Trivia on your mind? It has value

Trivia cloud

I’ve always believed nothing you experience or learn is ever wasted. This is especially true in our writing journey. Maybe you were never very good at sports. Yet participation in PE class taught you the fundamentals. When one of your characters is a jock, you have background material to make him believable. Don’t discard trivial things. Those pieces of trivia can make or break a novel.

Tidbits add depth to novels

tree

During my online critique group, we were going over a fellow-writers fantasy piece. The others pointed out great ideas for improvement.  Then I added my two cents, or shall I say pieces of trivia.  The author has a bird, a tree and a setting that all represented something. I pulled from my vast knowledge of weird trivial information to help the author clarify what kind of symbolism she may want based on the point each symbol was to represent. Somewhere in my trunk of little cared about facts I drew out tidbits regarding cedar trees and their significance.  That clarified things for her.

For writers, details are important. As much as I hate to analyze a piece of pros for symbolism. (That boring task we had to attempt in senior English.) I find as a reader my mind connects those tiny tidbits and subtle symbols to the plot and the characters psyche.

Go, Learn Things

Never underestimate the value of wandering through a museum or attending an ethnic festival. Don’t turn down an opportunity to learn something new.  As much as you may hate science or history there are bits of trivia that may seep into your brain and be the cornerstone of a plot line you need. Think docudramas from the History Channel.

 

 

We all know grammar skills are important tools. Yet a well-written sentence with incorrect information or boring similes will cause a reader to close your book faster than a cat fleeing the kitchen when bacon grease splatters his fur.

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I know many things about dog behavior because of dog groomers in my family. Those factoids helped shape Brutus the dog in my contemporary romance New Duet that releases May 2018. (Shameless promotion.) His behavior is pivotal to the lead characters storyline.

The more you read, the more you know.

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Although a recent scientific study claims our brains work at forgetting unimportant information making room for relevant facts. (High School French.) However, we still have a place in the far-recesses of our brain for trivia.  Memories glue those bits in our head. In a nanosecond we can recall baseball statistics, variations on a favorite card game or the state capitals we learned in fifth grade. Who remembers how to speak Pig Latin?

And many of these seemingly useless facts that don’t relate to our day job may just find a place in your novel or your critique partner’s.

Share some trivia you used to help shape your story world.

Less is More in Christmas Preparation

 

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My nativity display

Over the years I’ve cut back on all the preparation I make for Christmas. Partly because my children are grown, and my grandchildren have different interests. The other reason is my life is too full to spend the extra time doing as much as I use to.

 

This year I limited my decorating to my tree, my fireplace mantle and my nativity. Previously I had to clear off tabletops, end tables and bookcases to add more decorations. So much less work, a lovely reminder of the season and definitely less clutter.

 

coconut balls finished

Our almost 60 years old candy recipe still remains as part of my Christmas preparation.

 

I’ve reduced my baking list as well. I used to make peanut brittle, fudge, coconut balls, several kinds of cookies, special cakes and pies. Now it will consist of coconut balls, a fifty-year-old family candy and a few kinds of cookies. Oh yes, I’ll be helping the granddaughters bake pumpkin bread to give as gifts.

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Now that my children are grown they do a lot of Christmas baking themselves.  I will decorate sugar cookies to connect with my grandchildren and make a memory. But we will make less. Back when my five children and I did them, half the neighborhood kids would join us, and we’d make a ton of cookies, have great fun and send each child home with the cookies they decorated. But now it feels like so much more work with fewer kids who tend to get tired or bored before they are all done.

 

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When my children were young the neeighbor children came over and decorated cookies with us every Christmas for years.

 

I used to send out many Christmas cards with a newsletter to all my family and a few friends. I haven’t sent them out in a few years. Don’t really miss doing it. Social Media keeps me in contact with friends, and if I do a newsletter, it appears online. Most cards I sent were to aunts and uncles who are now passed away.

 

We will still go see the Christmas displays around town.  Driving around with a few grandkids will make it special. We’ve never decorated the outside of the house. I love to see others’ yard displays. I take the attitude of an old Crankshaft cartoon. He took his lights and decorated the neighbors’ house, so he could enjoy looking at them. When we have added lights to the windows they have been on the inside. Illinois winter weather after the Christmas season is often brutal. So, the thought of taking down lights before the mandatory February deadline the city imposes is unappealing.

 

Christmas Scrip 2

One of the Christmas yard displays  that covers a few blocks that tells the Nativity story. A long standing yearly tradition in Aurora, Illinois since the 60s.

 

Simplifying the preparation for the Holidays gives us more time to just relax and enjoy family, friends and Christmas movies. And for a writer, less stress is always priceless.

What Christmas preparation have you eliminated this year? Exchanged for a better plan or kept because your family loves it? 

 

Marilyn Peveto Shares Her Writing Journey

IMG_6733z(1)Today I welcome Marilyn Peveto. Her debut novel When Your Heart Comes Home released recently. Welcome Marilyn, it’s always fun to share my blog with fellow-authors. Let’s dive right in.  How did your writing adventure begin?

Thinking about my writing journey now, I believe it began many, many years ago when our mother took the time to read to us when we were very young. Our small town didn’t have a public library but she made sure we always had books available to read. This began an interest and a love for reading, and then a love for writing.

I always liked to write in some way. In early elementary school I would pen little stories about the events of the day. Later I wrote some poetry and personal essays. But it was only after my children graduated from high school and left for college that I decided I wanted to write a novel.

Of course, wanting to write a novel and doing it are two different things. I knew I had the desire but I didn’t know where to begin. I read about an upcoming writer’s conference in a city near my home and decided to attend. There I learned that I had much to learn, but I also met other writers in my area and joined a local guild.

It took years to complete my first novel. I truly can’t say how many years because I didn’t write continuously during that time. My husband and I had the opportunity to care for all four of our sweet parents during those years so my writing projects were put on hold for awhile.

I’m excited to say my first novel was released on November 14th, 2017. And I’m currently working on the second book in the series.

Tell us a bit about the novel you completed.

When Your Heart Comes Home is my first novel and is set in East Texas in the area

where I live. Texas’s first industrial revolution began in the virgin pine forests of my region around 1880. Up until the beginning of World War II the timber companies drew thousands of families into the sawmill towns and lumber camps.

I chose the time period of 1906 because my grandparents and great-aunts and uncles were young children during this time and they loved to tell of their experiences growing up in the towns that were built around a particular sawmill location in the pine forests.

Even though I heard the stories many years ago, they made an impact on me and stayed with me through the years. There’s just something special about an oral history. The language and feelings that come forth in the storytelling are unique and not easily forgotten.

When Your Heart Comes Home tells the story of Sarah Andersson, a young wife and mother, who is a prominent member of such a tiny sawmill town in East Texas. The struggles she faces and the successes she gains are chronicled in this tale.

Was there a lot of research involved in creating this novel and how did you go about it?

As with most historical fiction novels there was a lot of research involved. There are a couple of museums about two hours from my home that I visited and learned much from the exhibits. The Texas Forestry Museum in Lufkin, Texas has several permanent exhibits that were helpful. The Forest History Wing contained an exhibit entitled “Plain and Simple: Sawmill Folks at Home”. It represented life in a sawmill town in the early 1900’s. Another interesting display was the Sawmill Doctor’s office, an important part of any town during that time period.

The History Center in Diboll, Texas is another museum I visited and it has an extensive collection of photos of early sawmill towns.  They are displayed on panels in the exhibit area. The History Center also houses a library and research room with comfortable seating for reading and documenting information.

And probably the main source of research was the books that chronicle the events of the sawmill industry in East Texas. Many of those I already had in my library at home since I have always had an interest in the history of my region.

 

What inspired you to write your book?

I grew up surrounded by grandparents, great-aunts and uncles who loved to tell stories about their childhood in the early twentieth century. When I was a child we gathered on the front porch in the evening or after Sunday dinners and visited. Tales of life during the early 1900’s always intrigued me, probably because of the memories of those very special times with family.

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A bit about When Your Heart Comes Home

Sarah Andersson’s immigrant husband becomes homesick for his native Sweden and insists on returning. A prominent member of tiny Pineville, Texas, Sarah decides to stay behind with their two young children. After her husband is killed before leaving American shores, she grieves his death but is asked to rescue the town’s main business, the sawmill.
When her first love, Thomas Carson, returns to Pineville after a five-year absence, Sarah must put aside the past and ask Thomas to do the same. They can only save their town by working together.
While Sarah grieves, cares for her children, and runs the sawmill, she discovers she has feelings for Thomas. But she worries he hides a dark secret.
Will she allow herself to love again?

Now we’re going to redirect the questions to help my readers learn a little about you.

Do you have a favorite verse that resonates with you?

I’m always impressed with those who can say they have a favorite verse. I find that it’s taxing to try to narrow it to one. I think that at this time in my life and observing the world as it is today, I would have to say Ephesians 4:32:

“And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ

forgave you.” NKJV

What is your favorite genre to read for fun?

I’m fond of historical fiction. Sometimes I think it is because I found such joy in the books by Laura Ingalls Wilder when I was a child. I love to be transported to a different time in our country’s history.

Where is your favorite place to write?

I find I do my best writing at home. Sometimes it’s on the back porch soaking up the sunshine. In the winter it may be in a chair beside the fireplace. When I feel the need to be more structured I sit at the desk in my little office space. But it’s always at home with the beagles nearby.

More about Marilyn

Marilyn Peveto is a lifelong East Texan from a family that has lived in the Piney Woods for generations. Growing up hearing tales of sawmills at the turn of the twentieth century made the region’s history a natural setting for her stories.

Her hobbies include reading, browsing in antique stores for her next treasure, and cooking her family’s favorite southern foods.

Marilyn enjoys life with her two adult children, a son-in-law, an adorable granddaughter, her husband of forty-one years and two geriatric beagles who snooze at her feet as she writes.

Thank you for visiting here on Jubilee Writer. Sounds like an interesting read. My reads can purchase When Your Heart Comes Home on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, ibooks and Kobo.

Marilyn will be giving a copy of her book away to one lucky winner. All you need to do is comment below to be placed in a drawing.  The winner will be notified on Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, Christmas Tree, Oh, Christmas Tree were you in my setting

20171125_165252I love a good Christmas novella or two this time of year. Historical ones are my favorites. One thing you might not know unless you are a historical writer is that the Christmas tree was not always a part of American Christmas celebrations. So, finding one in a novella set before 1900s gives me pause.

The earlier a setting the less likely a tree in American History.

The Pilgrims didn’t celebrate Christmas. They considered the revelry of Christmas traditions sacrilegious, as did the Puritans in Massachusetts. So, if you set your story in 1600s America, there would be no tree.

Legend says Germany adopted the tradition of a Christmas tree when Martin Luther used the evergreen to explain the setting of the nativity to his children—just as Paul had used the statue to the unknown God to share Christ with the Greeks. (There are lots of articles on the internet explaining the origin of the Christmas tree in Europe.)

This strange custom brought to America by German immigrants took hundreds of years to become part of our Christmas celebrations.

There’s a variety of legends regarding the first Christmas tree in America. One being: Hessian soldiers (German mercenaries hired by King George to fight the colonists) brought the tradition with them. It is said a German immigrant in the 1830s decorated the first tree out west.gallery-1510848808-gettyimages-599911197

The media helped spread the tradition

Queen Victoria’s German husband Prince Albert is credited with introducing the tradition to English society about 1840. The tree was decorated with gifts for their children. An artist rendering of the tree appeared in the newspaper. Because of the popularity of Queen Victoria, the custom spread among the wealthy. They strove to have the most elaborately decorated trees.

B H Tree

Eventually the tradition crossed the pond. The first president of the United States to have a tree was Benjamin Harrison. (1889-1893). It was placed in his children’s play room. Allowing reporters to view the tree set the tradition in the forefront of American society.

By 1900 one in five households had a Christmas tree. Edison’s invention of Christmas tree lights made it safer for families to have a tree in their home. Before then, trees were illuminated with candles.

Strive for accuracy

When you write a historical that has any scenes focused around Christmas be sure to get the details right. Before the 1880—unless they were German immigrants—there probably wasn’t a tree. A little research should help you determine if a tree is essential for your setting. Most of the time there may be stockings hung or special dishes served. Some immigrants consider Christmas only a religious holiday while others added some version of Santa Clause.

A few additional historical tidbits

My Ukrainian friend celebrates Christmas in early January.

Three Kings’ Day is popular in many cultures. Gifts were given on January 6th rather than Christmas Day.

 

Check your facts regarding ethnicity of your characters when creating a Christmas scene.

 

 

Have you written a Christmas novel? Tell us about the traditions you added to your story.

 

New Zealand Author Carol Roberts Talks about her Writing Journey and Debut Fantasy Novel

 Carol RobertsToday I welcome Carol Roberts who makes her home in New Zealand. Her debut fantasy Atlantis is available now. Carol, I love to ask fellow-authors to share their writing journey. Please tell my readers about yours.

When I left school, I was interested in psychology, and I would have studied that, had I not decided to travel first. As was, I left my birth place of Vienna at the age of 18 and travelled through South America and Asia, indulging my interest in culture and tradition.

I met my husband-to-be in India, a photographer from New Zealand, and we ventured into places that were so distant and remote, that I can still remember the feeling of eternal timelessness that took ahold of me in such locations. I was completely fascinated; what were those people’s stories, what did they preserve in terms of their mythology? I took a lot of notes about places and people, and by the time I settled in New Zealand, I had a firm plan of compiling a non-fiction book about stories and myths from all around the world.

While working through the material that we had collected, I realized that I was more interested in understanding the meaning of those stories, rather than compiling them into a non-fiction book. I was especially interested in stories of creation, and if our collective psyche can possibly reach back to a point of evolution through these stories.

Extensive travel is something we all dream about. How wonderful for you. Now tell us about your debut novel and the inspiration behind it.

It’s a fiction book, called ‘Atlantis’; genre is mythical fantasy/mystery.

After I had spent endless hours interpreting mythical symbolism, I felt that a lot of stories try to portray the origins of our human condition. And that’s what I wanted to write about; a challenge that passes on from one generation to the next, the meaning of individual and collective destiny, and the consequence of choices made.

I started writing ‘Atlantis’ with a poem. The poem held th

Atlantis Carol Roberts

e clues of a mystery, and became the map. It’s too long to quote, but it held the essence of what I was about to write, and I kept on interpreting it as I went.

 

Here is the back- cover blurb

Here is the blurb:  When Alanthea, high-priestess of Atlantis, connects to a woman in her dreams, she becomes haunted by a mystery. Compelled to trace the other woman’s life she finds coded poems that hold clues to the predicament of her people. Now she has to venture ever farther into forbidden territory to link past and present, and understand the real danger threatening Atlantis.

Arakon always thought of himself as an orphan, a loner without any real belonging. But after a strange encounter his life changes, and he is drawn into events beyond his control.

They move parallel in their search for answers until their destinies converge, and the weave unravels. Yet what they finally uncover lies deep at the heart of collective evolution, and what has been set in motion cannot be undone.

Now I’d like to take my questions in a different direction.

Who is your best support system to keep you focused on your writing?

My husband in all matters writing and helping me to ‘man up’ and stand by my work. My publisher, Stephanie, for picking up ‘Atlantis’ and giving me confidence.

What is your favorite genre to read for fun?

Romance, hands down. There is nothing like a good romance.

How interesting, I write romance yet enjoy a lot of fantasy on TV, movies and novels.

So, tell us your favorite place to write?

Where-ever I find that piece of paper and pen when I have an urgency to write. This could be virtually anywhere, lol.

We can all relate to that. Thanks so much for visiting with us today.

Here’s a little about Carol Roberts.

Carol Roberts is a free lance writer with particular interest in cultural myth. Originally from Vienna, she has spent all of her adult life in the Far North of New Zealand. Her work took her to several different countries, where she indulged her fascination with stories, particularly those dealing with the creation of man.  ‘Atlantis’ is her first full length novel.

Blog/Newsletter: https://www.smore.com/app/pages/preview/jb2ug,

Twitter: @authorRobertsC

Buy link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0777J2MC8/

Check out Carol’s creative Christmas giveaway. Everyone is a winner

For all those who purchase Atlantis before December 31st, I will say THANK YOU by sending you a free copy of my second novel Tower of Babel. Go to this link after you purchase Atlantis and sign up to receive Tower of Babelhttps://www.smore.com/app/pages/preview/fpnxr