Four Considerations That Will Help You Write A Good Bible Study

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By Trina Bresser Mautos

Writing a good Bible study can be a daunting task. Thinking through the following topics and answering their associated questions lays a solid foundation for a meaningful study.

 

Audience

For any audience, it is imperative to know whom you are writing for. What you write and how you write it will be very different for a Bible study aimed at teenagers versus one aimed at seasoned Christians versus one aimed at new believers.

Some questions that will help you define your audience include:

  • What is the age range of my audience?
  • Should the gender of my audience affect how I approach writing the study?
  • How educated is my audience?
  • How familiar are they with the Christian faith?
  • Is there a particular denominational association I need to take into account?
  • Does my audience know the definition of basic terms I am using or do they need to be explained?

Epistles

Type and Style of Bible Study

There are a wide range of Bible studies types. Two basic types are book and topical. A book study looks at one book or portion of a book of the Bible to understand its message. A topical study looks at understanding the sections of scripture that cover a particular topic.

Once the type is determined, the style you will use is the next consideration. Styles to consider include fill in the blank, including referenced scripture versus having readers look up references, highly structured questions or open-ended questions, teaching that dives deeply into the meaning of the scripture or stays more on the surface.

 

Questions to consider as you think through the type of study and style you will use.

  • What is the most appropriate type of study for the truth(s) I want to convey?
  • Is the type and style of study I am using the most appropriate for my audience?
  • Do I have a good balance in the amount of scripture I am covering in each chapter of the study?
  • Am I consistent in the approach I am using to my teaching?
  • How can I best engage my audience in the material I am writing?

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Context

Context is perhaps the most important consideration when interpreting scripture. Scripture taken out of context can be used to prove just about anything. To ensure that false conclusions are not reached, scripture must be considered in its full context. To fully understand the context of a passage, historical, cultural, and grammatical aspects need to be taken into account.

For instance, understanding kinsman redeemers (Lev. 25.25-28) helps explain why Naomi was overjoyed to learn Ruth was gleaning in Boaz’s field (Ruth 2.19-23).

 

One particular practice to be cautious of is called proof texting. The name comes from using single verses or short passages to prove a point of view. Proof texting has been used by cults and radical organizations to support their doctrinal views, but these views often stray far from solid Christian doctrine. Protect against proof texting by taking the greater context into account.

  • When considering a verse, how does it fit into the rest of the chapter?
  • How does a chapter fit into the message of the book in which it occurs as well as the context of the entire Bible?
  • What historically, cultural, and/or grammatical aspects are important to the passage?

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Application

A truly good Bible study is not just about learning more about the scriptures and what they say. There have been countless people throughout the generations who have had great scriptural knowledge, but have neglected to apply it to their own lives. To use a modern cliché, knowledge without application most often results in talking the talk, but not walking the walk. Application allows the words of scripture to form the actions of our lives so we are transformed into the image of Jesus.

 

 

Questions that help determine application include:

  • Does the scripture contain a specific call to action?
  • Are there terms that need to be defined in order to understand how to apply the scripture?
  • How did the original audience understand the scripture?
  • Are there cultural aspects to the scripture that need to be defined in order to understand how they apply in the 21st century?
  • Is the application stated in easy to understand terms that encourage readers to make a change?

Perhaps one of the most important things I have learned in both writing and doing Bible studies is that sometimes there are no easy answers. There is a tension that comes with unanswered questions that our culture tends to shy away from. But it is often in the tension that God does His best work. Therefore a good Bible study should not expect to answer every question, but allow the reader to live in the tension and give God the space to bring about the transformation He desires.

Book links:

Paul’s Letters to the Early Church https://www.amazon.com/dp/1941103421

The Epistles of James, Peter, and Jude https://www.amazon.com/dp/1941103464

Birth of the Church: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Acts https://www.amazon.com/dp/1946016357

 

Book Blurb: Reading and studying the Bible can be a daunting task. Verses often require a great deal of study, prayer, and meditation in order to gain an adequate understanding. But don’t lose heart! God reveals His Word to those who earnestly seek Him (Jer. 29:13). The Christian Living Bible Study Series is designed to assist you in your relationship with God, help you understand difficult passages, shed new light on familiar verses, and gain an appreciation for statements made within the confines of ancient cultural practices. These books bring Jesus, His followers, and their ministry to life. As you learn more about the history and purpose of each verse, you will find yourself growing in wisdom and knowledge.

About Trina:

Trina Bresser Matous is a passionate Bible teacher and writer. For over 20 years, she has shared Biblical truths in compelling and memorable ways. She is involved in her church as a Bible study leader and a member of the Restorative Prayer Team, which strives to bring healing dialogue with the Holy Spirit to the hurting parts of people’s lives. She is the author of the Christian Living Bible Study Series, which currently includes Paul’s Letters to the Early Church, The Epistles of James, Peter and Jude, and Birth of the Church: Matthew, Mark, Luke and Acts.

Trina, thank you for being my guest and sharing such helpful information.

If anyone has questions about writing Bible Studies post it in the comments for Trina.

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Tips for Writing a Stellar Novella Part 2

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Peg Thomas is back today to continue her tips for novella writing. Last week she talked about word count and having a complete story. There is a link at the bottom for part one if you missed it.

Timeline

Another simplification is the timeline. Where a novel may span a year or more, a novella needs to be shorter. This creates some issues with romance, since the characters won’t know each other very long. This is where the writer gets creative. In Her Redcoat, Laurette and Henry meet several times in the forest and that’s enough for them to fall in love. How is that possible? They are lonely people on the frontier. I used the time and place make it feasible.

A Pinch of historic flavor

Simplify the history and the setting. They should be a flavoring like a pinch of salt and not an all-you-can-eat buffet. If you’re writing historical you must have some history, but you’ve room for just a touch. It’s easy in a novel to let history overtake the story, and that’s a bigger danger in a novella. Your setting should be minimal, not portrayed with long, drawn out paragraphs of the sunrise or someone’s ancestral home. In some novels, the setting is almost another character, but you can’t do that in a novella.

Which scenes to cut

In any story, you should cut scenes that don’t move the story forward, but that’s critical in a novella. Even if it’s a great scene with stellar writing. Even if it’s your favorite scene. Even if your mother loves it. If it doesn’t move the story forward, it’s got to go.

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Click her to order this collect that contains Her Redcoat

Pegg has a few more tips to share so tune in for Part 3 next Tuesday and if you missed part one check it out.

 

Pegg Thomas lives on a hobby farm in Northern Michigan with Michael, her husband of *mumble* years. A life-long history geek, she writes “History with a Touch of Humor.” When not working or writing, Pegg can be found in her barn, her garden, her kitchen, or sitting at her spinning wheel creating yarn to turn into her signature wool shawls.

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A Visit with Shellie Arnold Author of the Barn Church Series

Shellie Arnold has graciously agreed to visit me again. Her books always speak to my heart on some level. Welcome, girlfriend.

Shellie Arnold

Hi Cindy. Great to be back here.

Let’s start with a question I love to ask. When did you realize your calling to create words on paper to share with the world?

Honestly, when I first considered writing I was in the eighth grade. I wanted to help marriages. I wanted to help people avoid the pain of divorce. I had no idea what the writing process would look like, no idea what to do to pursue publication. Only that I wanted to give people what they needed to have healthy marriages.

I actually confided this in the one person I thought would support me—the key word being “thought.” That individual’s reaction “Who would buy it?” crushed me. For years I didn’t talk of writing. I set it aside figuring that person knew what they were talking about. Then someone else I trusted (and there weren’t many) encouraged me to consider writing. She didn’t know of my conversation years ago with another. My desire to help marriages had only strengthened, so I let myself begin.

I for one am glad you didn’t let the naysayer crush your calling.

Now share with us how you do research for your books?

For the Barn Church series books, rather than trying to accurately describe and document a setting or town, I created my own. I did have to research maps and other details to make that town fit where I wanted it to, but I think creating my own setting decreased the stress of writing a series. If I wanted a water tower outside the town, I could put one there! LOL

As far as non-fiction, I’m working on my first marriage topic book regarding sexual intimacy in marriage. That is requiring a lot of research and time, because I’m pulling from many resources to support my approach to the subject.

You mentioned the Barn Church series, your first three novels. How does your non-fiction tie in with the series?

Great question. My burden is for marriages and families. As I said earlier, my original intent with regard to writing sat on the non-fiction side. I’ve only been pursuing fiction over the last decade or so. But my desire to offer tangible, actionable help for hurting marriages never left. To me, in my fiction, I can talk about the feelings and background and thoughts of my characters, as they process their dilemnas. The non-fiction books I hope to complete, and the teaching materials we are currently producing all deal with the subjects, issues, and problems presented in my fiction.

So, if a reader wants to read a great story, hopefully I’ve delivered that. But if God uses my stories to speak to them about a particular area of their marriage, I want to provide resources and materials that can help them. That’s what I originally started out to do. While I hadn’t planned to get there through fiction, it makes sense to me God would also want me to use story to help marriages. After all, Jesus often spoke in parables.

Do you have a favorite verse that resonates with you?

Yes. My favorite verse(s) are Isaiah 1:18, 19 NIV. “Come now, and let us reason together,” says the Lord. “[a]Though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall be like wool. 19 “If you are willing and obedient, you shall eat the best of the land;”

I love these verses because they tell me God is willing to discuss my sin with me—why I do certain things, think a certain way, where the lies I tell myself come from—when I approach him with a willingness to be obedient in the future. He doesn’t simply demand a certain standard of behavior from believers, although many people think He does. No, He comes alongside us and will teach us why we do the things we do, and how to live differently. I need that. I don’t want to be the same person today I was yesterday, and I don’t want to be the same person tomorrow I am today. Knowing God is with me for the long haul, no matter how long it takes to teach me and heal me, is critical to my life.

Does this verse correspond to your writing in any way?

Yes! Absolutely. Each of my first three novels deals with one specific problem that can be present in a marriage. I show both viewpoints—husband and wife—and they each have their own problems and issues, like we all do. Hopefully, the message of my favorite verses resonates throughout all of my novels. That God will forgive. He will make new. He will teach us and change us and guide us. He will lead us in paths of righteousness for His name’s sake. God will help all who ask. He’s always right there, no matter how big a mess we believe we’ve made of our marriage.

You sound like you’re speaking from experience. Would you care to tell us about that?

My husband and I had everything stacked against us when we married. Neither of us had learned how to resolve conflict. Neither of us had learned how to communicate effectively without anger or shutting down. We are both sexual abuse survivors. My parents divorced when I was a teenager—statistically, we probably shouldn’t have made it a year.

Consequently, we made so many mistakes of the years. Stupid mistakes. Mistakes from stubbornness and ignorance. From thinking we were doing the right things, and even demanding our own way about different things. But we didn’t want to let go of each other. And because God put love in our hearts, we wanted to honor and grow that love, even though we didn’t know how.

Learning to walk with God through repentance, learning, and change has not only made our spiritual lives rich, it’s saved our marriage over and over again. God isn’t stingy with wisdom, discernment, strength, or His love. All we have to do is ask with the right attitude, listen, and respond.

About Shellie:

Shellie Arnold is a writer and speaker on marriage and family. She truly believes—despite baggage, neglect, or mistakes—if a husband and wife listen to God, they can live happily even after. Her passion is sharing how God is helping her do exactly that. She maintains a blog at  http://www.shelliearnold.com and is the founder of YOUR MARRIAGE resources. Shellie is a mother of three and has home schooled for over twenty years. She lives in Ohio with her husband of thirty-one years.

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Buy links:

Amazon link for The Spindle Chair: https://tinyurl.com/ybfz46kd

Amazon link for Sticks and Stones: https://tinyurl.com/ybqbfx4k

Amazon link for Abide With Me: https://tinyurl.com/y7njecln

Shellie it is always a blessing to have you stop by. Hope to have you again in the future.

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Tips for Writing a Stellar Novella, Part 1

Novella Tips

Have you ever read a novella that felt like the story stopped with the word count? All of a sudden your at the last page and you felt cheated. Today I welcome Pegg Thomas, editor, author, Managing editor of Smitten an imprint of LPC to share the formula for writing a successful novella.  A novella that keeps you reading and gives the reader a sigh-worthy ending. Today and the next two Tuesdays Pegg will be giving us the tools we need to nail down a great novella.

When Cindy asked me to do a guest post on how writing a novella is different than writing a novel, I thought it would be simple. The answer is obvious—use fewer words. But the real knack for novella writing is learning how to use fewer words.

In my genre, historical romance, full-length novels average 85,000 words. Novellas average 25,000 words. If you’re any good at math, and I’m not, this means you have roughly 30% of the words in a novella that you have in a novel.

Let’s first consider what we can’t leave out.

A novella must be a complete story. That means it must have a hook, a 1st plot point, a mid-point shift, a 2nd plot point, and a climax—a full story structure. Along with that, it must have fleshed-out characters with their own goals, motivations, and conflicts that build their character arcs. You still need to use all the senses as you write. Bring a bit of smell, taste, touch, sound, and sight into your novella to make it real. And in my genre, there needs to be both history and romance.

So what can we leave out?

It’s not so much leaving out as it is simplifying. Novellas typically have fewer secondary characters, for instance. There isn’t the word space to develop any character that isn’t necessary. Even if the character is oh-so-cute and lovable—axe it if he or she isn’t essential to the story. If the heroine is one of fourteen siblings, at least ten of them need to remain off-screen.

Subplots, which are essential to a good novel, get squeezed out of the novella. There may be one, but it won’t get the full attention that it would in a novel. It’ll be more of a mini-subplot. For instance, in Embattled Hearts, the main plot is Alannah escaping her abusive stepfather, and Stewart helping her as they fall in love. The subplot is the end of the Pony Express. I didn’t spend much time expounding on it, but it’s mentioned a few times and things are happening that the reader sees. In a full-length novel, I’d have explored that subplot more.

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Click here to buy this collection with Pegg’s novella Embattled Hearts

Next Tuesday Part 2:  Trimming the timeline, history backgroound and setting.

Pegg Thomas lives on a hobby farm in Northern Michigan with Michael, her husband of *mumble* years. A life-long history geek, she writes “History with a Touch of Humor.” When not working or writing, Pegg can be found in her barn, her garden, her kitchen, or sitting at her spinning wheel creating yarn to turn into her signature wool shawls.

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Celebrating Secret & Charades One Year Birthday and a Giveaway

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Today marks the first birthday of my debut novel Secrets & Charades. She had a long gestation period. Twelve years from concept to publication. Ten years in the writer’s womb doing rewrites, submitting proposals and receiving about 20 rejects. (The exact number escapes my memory. All new mothers forget the painful parts.)

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My award. I am so blessed.

Labor began when I won the Editor’s Choice Award in 2014. This resulted in two more years of laborious rewrites and editing with two wonderful book labor coaches Molly Really and Andrea Merrell.

 

Before my baby arrived, I had to wait for the Cover Design and do marketing to announce its release. I post the ultra sound photos of famous actors and models who represented my characters.

Talked about the historical content.

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When the Cover Design was finished, I posted it on my social media so everyone could see the cute outfit my novel would be wear.

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The big day came, March 15th, 2017 we had a wonderful launch party where I gave gifts to my guest to celebrate the arrival of my baby. A few weeks later I had a live launch and my guest cooed over my darling.  Recently, Secrets & Charades won the Maxwell Award. A proud mother moment.

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A year later it still has decent ratings. A sibling will arrive in May. My Contemporary Romance, New Duet is different from my Historical Romance. They will compete for my marketing time. Although we all know the newborn gets the most attention. Hopefully, by 2019 there will be some more Historical Romances joining my book family. I imagine a few contemporaries as well.

Oh, Secrets & Charades is being cloned as an Audio book coming soon. I am so excited. (More on that in another post.)

Thanks for stopping by and helping me celebrate and reminisce.

The Giveaway

I am giving away one autograph copy of Secrets & Charades and a $10 Amazon card to one lucky winner. Share this blog on your social media and post in the comments on the blog that you did, and you’ll be entered in the giveaway. Be sure to leave your email written as myname at my server dot com. I’ll contact the winner next Friday.

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Conference Tips that Lead to Publication Success

Over the years I’ve attended a lot of conferences. And I’ve decide to share my secret for getting notice by the right people. You may be disappointed. Because my secret is not a fast food design but rather a slow cooker approach.1320642_Red

  1. Volunteer to help. Some conferences give you discounts for picking up people at the airport and helping set up the day before the conference. Even if they don’t it’s a great opportunity. While you serve you meet speakers and other authors.

 

  1. Be friendly. Encourage other attendees. Talk to the girl in the corner who looks about ready to run like a scared rabbit. She could be the next JK Rowlings or Karen Kingsbury and she will remember your kindness.

 

  1. Be respectful to the speakers and your fellow-attendees. Don’t monopolize an editor or agents time if a group is waiting to ask questions. Don’t complain loud and long if no one jumped at the chance to publish your work. Negativity tears down any potential bridges to future publication.

 

  1. Attend classes and workshops. Ask questions, interact. Be the one who gets the instructor a glass of water or passes out papers. Your servants heart will get noticed.

 

  1. Ask how you can help others. Share what you know with other authors. Introduce them to agents, editors, publishers you know if you think the authors work might fit their needs. This is not a step on others to get a head business.

 

  1. Engage during meals and break times. Invite lost conferences to seat at your table. Ask them about their writing, their goals and their family. Exchange business cards.

 

  1. Follow directions. Read all the conference information and abide by the rules. Submit manuscripts to contests exactly as requested. Take only the 15 minutes you are allowed for your appointment and be on time.

 

  1. Don’t be an appointment stalker. You know what I mean. The conferencee who rarely attends any classes because they are trying to squeeze in as many extra appointments as they can. They hang around the room and wait to fill canceled appointments and empty seats. Agents and publishers will recall their name but not in a good way.

 

  1. Friend other attendees on social media. Those contacts may be the golden goose as they too get published.

 

10.Promote others. Pass along their success on your social media. Volunteer to do book   reviews. If you have a blog asked them to be your guest.

 

Final Words of Wisdom: As my aunt would say, “Cast your bread upon the water and by and by it will return to you.”  In other words, you will reap the benefits of the good things you sow. Publication will come your way.

 

Extra tip: Attending classes and workshops is more valuable than appointments in the long game. First you learn great stuff to improve your writing craft and marketing skills and second the teachers are often agents, editors and publishers. Make it a point to be attentive and thank them for their time and you will gain friends. Before I signed with my agent he asked around the faculty. He told me how pleased he was that so many knew me.

This crock pot method took years, but it was so worth it. I’ve got a second novel coming out soon. Another finished, another in process that editors are interested in and I was just asked to be in a novella collection.

Anyone else care to share their secrets to success at conferences that lead to publication.

 

Cozy up with three of My Favorite New Releases

If you’ve been following this blog for a while you all know I am a verocious reader. As such I am on occasion given an ARC copy and asked to post a review. I am happy to do it. Recently I reviewed two new releases and Michelle Shocklee and Jennifer Lemont Leo are now on my favorite author list. The third book I read was a novella collection with one of my favorite novella authors Pegg Thomas. Below you’ find my reviews, the back cover blurb and a buy link.

The Widow of Rosehill

I received an Advanced Readers Copy of the Widow of Rosehill. I am under no obligation to give it a good review. Which made me feel comfortable checking it out. I loved the first book in the series The Planter’s Daughter. But I didn’t care for the secondary character of Natalie. She was spoiled and spineless. She is the main character in the Widow of Rosehill. Six years later with the Civil War just ended and her horrible husband dead Natalie has grown up a lot. Her focus is raising her son. Being informed by an official decree that the south has lost the war and her slaves are free was an awakening for this southern belle. I loved Natalie’s willingness to change, work alongside the slaves who decided to stay and help her. Enter an abolitionist Colonel and the sparks fly between Natalie and Levi. Each learning that the other is not the enemy. It was fun to envision the hero with a full beard. Very much in keeping with the era. Michelle Shocklee has a gift with words. And her historical accuracy brought the story to life. I stayed up too late reading it and the plot haunted my dreams until I finished it. I look forward to more books by this author.

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Widowed during the war, Natalie Ellis finds herself solely responsible for Rose Hill plantation. When Union troops arrive with a proclamation freeing the slaves, all seems lost. How can she run the plantation without slaves? In order to save her son’s inheritance she strikes a deal with the arrogant, albeit handsome, Colonel Maish. In exchange for use of her family s property, the army will provide workers to bring in her cotton crop. But as her admiration for the colonel grows, a shocking secret is uncovered. Can she trust him with her heart and her young, fatherless son?

Natalie Ellis is everything Colonel Levi Maish loathes: a Southern slave owner. When he and his men arrived in Texas with the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves still in bondage despite the war having ended, he feels little concern for the trail of plantation owners left in its wake without workers. But the plight of the beautiful Widow Ellis stirs to life his compassion and the heart he’d thought cold as stone after witnessing the carnage of war. While the army camps on her land, Levi finds himself contemplating a future with Natalie and Samuel. But when he learns where her husband perished during the war, he knows a life with Natalie is impossible. How could she ever forgive him for what he’d done in battle on the banks of the Bull Run?

Buy links:

 

Ain’t Misbehavin’ is the sequel to You’re the Cream in My Coffee. Sequels are not always easy to write, and they need to be every bit as good as the first one. I found Ain’t Misbehavin’ as engaging as the first book. I loved looking back to a by gone era. Jennifer Lemont Leo has sprinkled tidbits of culture, inventions and history throughout the story of Charlie Corrigan and Dot Rogers. We were introduced to them in You’re the Cream in My Coffee.

The characters struggle with their own versions of low self-esteem. Charlie was injured in World War I, feeling unworthy of any woman’s love.  Dot had a father who verbal abused her and she’s made some bad decisions leaving her convinced she is unworthy of true love. Many of the characters from the first book help frame Charlie and Dot’s story. Some giving great advice, others causing trouble. At one point I found myself saying “Oh no, Dot don’t do it.” When I’m talking to the characters then I’m totally hooked on the story.  The setting may be 1929 but the heart of the story is timeless.

I was given an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for my honest opinion. I can honestly say this well-written, well-researched novel is well-worth the reader’s time.

 

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In Jazz Age Chicago, Dot Rodgers sells hats at Marshall Field while struggling to get her singing career off the ground. Independent and feisty, she’s the life of the party. But underneath the glitter, she doesn’t believe she’s worth the love of a good man. Why would a strong, upstanding man want to build a future with a shallow, good-time girl like her?

Small-town businessman Charlie Corrigan carries scars from the Great War. After all he’s been through, he wants nothing more than to marry and start a family. But the woman he loves is a flamboyant flapper with no intention of settling down. She’s used to a more glamorous life than he can offer. As his fortunes climb with the stock market, it seems he’s finally going to win her love. But what happens when it all comes crashing down?

Buy link

Bouquet of Brides.

This novella collection spans from colonial times to the early 1900s. Every heroine has a flower name. Every hero has to win his flower. The backdrops of each story is very different. But the basic dilemma remains the same—finding love and declaring it amidst what appears to the characters to be insurmountable odds. Nice historical research and characters to root for.

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Meet seven American women who were named for various flowers but struggle to bloom where God planted them. Can love help them grow to their full potential?

Holly and Ivy by Mary Davis (1890, Washington State)
At Christmastime, Holly Harrison accompanies her impetuous younger sister on her trip across the country to be a mail-order bride. But even as she tries to persuade her sister that loving a stranger is foolhardy, Holly loses her own heart to a fellow traveler.

Periwinkle in the Park by Kathleen Kovach (1910, Colorado)
Periwinkle Winfield is a hiking guide helping to commission a national park. But a run-in with a mountain man who is determined to keep the government off his land may place her in great danger.

At Home with Daffodils by Paula Moldenhauer (1909, Oklahoma)
When her childhood sweetheart returns to town, will Dilly Douglas accept the worthy heart he offers, or will the old wound he opens keep them apart?

A Song for Rose by Suzanne Norquist (1882, Rockledge, Colorado)
Can Patrick O’Donnell, a tenor disillusioned by the performance industry, convince Rose Miller that that there is more to music than her dream of joining an opera company?

Beauty in a Tansy? by Donita K. Paul (1918, South Dakota)
Tansy Terrell was named after a weed. When she opens shop next door, Arthur Blake recognizes Tansy’s need to be valued as a beautiful flower but fails to see his own worth as a maker of instruments and music.

A Prickly Affair by Donna Schlachter (1885, Arizona)
A rough-and-tumble cowgirl, “Cactus” Lil Duncan longs for true love, but is afraid to let down her prickly exterior when a city slicker from New York City, with less-than-honorable intentions, tries to win her heart and her hand.

In Sheep’s Clothing by Pegg Thomas (1702, Connecticut)
Peter Maltby might be all good looks and charm, working in the new mill fulling wool, but Yarrow Fenn fears he is the Crown’s agent in disguise who will destroy the only livelihood she has.
Buy link

I obviously love Historical romance. But I do read in other genres. And I will be blogging about those in the future. If you’d love to read more reviews don’t forget to subscribe so you can receive each new post in your email.