Why Network?

networkng5

Networking with an editor and other writers over lunch.

Eva Marie Everson posted a video clip on Facebook. She’d ask James Watkins what was the one piece of advice he’d give authors. His answer. “Three words: network, network, network.”

As an author and editor he understands the value more than most.

We’d rather write

Writers are stereotyped as introverts and shy. Although I have never been accused of either, I understand how much alone time is required to create awesome words.  Writers prefer to spend their free hours writing and reading rather than anything else. But networking is too essential to be ignored.

An important key

Networking is a key to getting published. Really!  The more writers you get to know, editors you befriend and publishers you are acquainted with opens doors. At a conference you may find the perfect lead to a magazine or editor who is looking for the very thing you write. The book you pitched to Editor A wasn’t suited to his present needs. After a few conferences of maintaining dialogue with Editor A, he asks to see the manuscript you pitched a few years ago. Now his publisher is frantic for your theme.

people meeting around table

Critique groups are networking opportunity too.

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I keep in touch with Susan Baganz, Acquistion Editor for Prism Book Group on Facebook.

You’re struggling to improve your craft. Your rejection letter, all have a common theme—your writing’s not great. A writer friends hooks you up with a critique group. The group helps you see the weak spots and encourages your progress. You get the contract that’s evaded you for years.

Writer friends understand you and your goals. So build those relationships.

Editors are more likely to give your manuscript a second look if they are acquainted with you and see your persistence in developing into a better writer.

Network in your community

Networking isn’t restricted to the writing world. Historical writers might get involved with local historical societies. Any genre might find some buyers at local festivals. Visitors will discover you’re an author. They find it cool to know someone local writes “real” books.  Network with an organization that promotes the message you spent years putting on paper. If your story is about adoption or foster care, volunteer in organizations who banner your cause.

Networking helps create a fan base for book sales, future contracts, and speaking engagements.

20140607_201600

Rowena Kuo, Acquistion Editor of LPC and I developed a great friendship over the years that eventual lead to my current contract.

Works for me

My personal journey to publication was on the road of networking. The people in the literary world I have gotten to know and helped on their journey have made a difference. As I explained in a previous post, it took me ten years to get a book contract. I truly believe if I had not made an effort to network, I would still be on the outside looking in. I say a hearty amen to James Watkins statement. Network, network, network.

What are your thoughts on networking? What kind of success have you had with networking? Please leave a comment.

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Ten years in the Making: A Book Contract

contract

 

If you follow me on Facebook, you saw my recent announcement. I received my first book contract. It only took 10 years to get there. Oh, let’s not forget 20 rejections, many rewrites and several edits. Years of improving my writing skills through online writing courses and writing books.  Ten years of attending conferences. Submitting to magazines and websites with both success and failure. I’ve made the acquaintance of many writers, both newbies and seasoned pros. During my ten year journey I have added agents and publishers to that list of acquaintances.

Help others on the journey

I’ve written over a hundred book reviews and supported my fellow-writers anyway I can. I enjoy helping promote their books and sharing words of affirmation when they were discouraged. I have purposed to invest in others while I worked toward the illusive contract.

Keep learning

Actions such as joining critique groups, following writing blogs and reading a lot propelled me toward the goal of publication. This has been ten years of perseverance and determination. I’d confess “I am a writer” when I wanted to keep that proclamation to myself. Established writers encouraged me to learn how to use social media.  Then I started this blog, Writer’s Patchwork, where all these writerly parts are sown together into the bigger quilt of gaining a contract. (Clever play on words.)

Cindy's Editor's Choice Award-2

My award. I am so blessed.

Never give up

Anyway, the point I’m trying to press home is don’t give up. Don’t get discouraged and keep helping others in the industry. Keep focusing on your goal and over time you’ll get that book contract.

Come follow me

It will probably be a year before my novel will be available for sale. During that time, I will be posting the next stretch of my journey. Even though I have a contract, a mountain-load of work remains to be done before I see my book in print. I’ll share my experiences in hopes of inspiring all of you to keep going. And give you a glimpse into the process of contract to book shelf.

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Three Ways Your Life Experience Can Be Shared With The World

 

Book heart-2

Your true story doesn’t have to be written by you. Check out a professional.

Often I hear from people who learn I’m a writer that they are going to write a book someday. Many people may profess it, but few actually do it. I’ve read a variety of blogs and heard speakers tell of people sharing how everyone says their life should be a book and their story needs to be told to the world. Those bloggers and speakers share helpful hints with their audience on how to determine whether your message should be dispensed in book form.

Because most of my posts for the next two months are going to be reposts of my ten conference tips, I thought this subject blended well. Because at every conference there are people with a passion to get their story told but no idea how. They hope to find an agent or publisher to agree to publish it.

Is this a book of my heart?

There are many things that have happened in my life—true miracles. There are tragedies as well. None of which I have felt at the present are a book of my heart. Some of those experiences take form in some of my characters in my fictional world however. But if one or more of your life experiences burns in your heart to be told, then I’ll help you explore ways to accomplish this.

Scenario one

Let’s pretend for the sake of this blog post that I have had a wondrous experience, and every time I share it people insist I need to write a book.  I’ve never written anything so I find the idea daunting. Yet, the thought takes root in my heart and won’t let go.

Let’s assume I know a writer. And I share my story and my desire to write a book. They smile politely and tell me to take some writing classes to learn the craft. I’m a little offended that they should suggest such a thing. After all, this story needs to be told. I don’t have time to waste on classes. Besides don’t publishers fix your mistakes?

So I attend a writer’s conference with the intent of finding an agent or publisher. I have a handwritten copy of my story and determination on my side. Okay, so maybe I have a typed copy, but it is single spaced. Perhaps I have a copy in 16-point font, single spaced on pink paper all neatly bound in a colorful cover.  A few copies even. You see where I am going with this.  No publisher or agent takes these kind of presentations seriously. There are industry standards which I will not discuss here.

Even though I strike out achieving my original goal, I make a connection. A writer hears my story and suggests I get a ghost writer. She connects me up with a fellow-writer. During a meeting he decides what I need is a writing coach to help bring my story to light.

Another scenario

This time I am joined at my conference lunch table by a magazine editor. I share my story and my battle plan for getting it published. He asks, “Have you ever consider writing an article about your experience.”

“But I want to write a book.” I declare. I am thinking a magazine article would not have the same impact.

“Our magazine has a circulation of 100,000. I’d love to publish your story.”

“Wow! I had no idea.”

 

Heart microphone-2

Sharing your story to groups of people may be another way to get a publishers attention.

Still another scenario

During a break I am trying to decide what class to take when I overhear someone singing the praises of the Speaker class. My curiosity is piqued and I attend. There I discover a new possibility. Speaking in various venues. I learn how to get the word out about the story I want to share. I immediately order all CDs.

 

My point

Book form may not be the best way to get the story of your heart before your desired audience. At least not at first. A magazine has large readership and gives your story a great chance to be read by many more than you may get in book sales. The article or series of articles could get you the attention of a publisher and be the outline for a book. Again, learning the craft of article writing is a must.

Perhaps sharing your story in a speaker’s format is more effective. Some stories are best shared orally. These days it’s easy to place stuff on You Tube or create a podcast to share your story.

A writing coach or ghost writer might be the best way to get your message in book form quickly. Otherwise it is imperative to learn the craft of writing well. And that can take years.

Ghost writer pic-2

Ghost writers and writing coaches may be just the ticket to getting your story told in a compelling way.

Be aware that coaches and ghost writers do this for a living and will expect to be paid. It is worth every penny to give your story its best chance at sales. Many wonderful true stories which have soared to the best seller list were written for the individual by professional writers. Ninety Minutes in Heaven is a great example.

If you have a book in your heart, perhaps these tips will help you decide how you want to share it with the world.

 

I’d love to hear any questions from those who want to get their story out there. And if you’ve successfully shared your life experience to the masses, please tell us about it.

 

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Navigating the Confusing World of Rights and Royalties

Understand what rights you are selling and read the fine print on a contract.

Understand what rights you are selling and read the fine print on a contract.

Today I promised to share about rights and royalties. Right here in the first paragraph is my disclaimer: I am no expert. So, do your research before signing on the dotted line. Rights and royalties can be a bit confusing so hang in there. Publishing rights cover a multitude of art forms from music lyrics to artwork to e-books. Obviously, because this is a blog about writing, I will be focusing on writer’s publishing rights. So let’s begin.

All rights: After publication you may not resell your manuscript. This may seem reasonable at first blush. Read the fine print carefully. All rights can also cover your article appearing on the web or used in an anthology or portion used in other publications. Ask yourself if you are comfortable surrendering all rights for the price offered.

I had the experience back in the 80s of accepting an all rights contract for radio scripts I wrote for a ministry. They turned them into to narratives and these stories are still circulating today. I was thrilled to get my name out there and was naive regarding payment. So, at the time I was content. Now, however, I would be less likely to take a contract like this unless my goal is strictly building writing creds. We all need writing creds.

All rights on a book can include the novel itself, movie, international, e-book and audio rights. Be sure you have an agent or a contract lawyer look over the terms of the contract before signing. They know what to ask to protect your work and get you the best deal for future residual income.

First rights: You are offering the publication the first option to publish your work. First rights means the rights revert back to the author to resubmit it to another periodical. The publisher may have a clause in the contract instructing you to wait a specific time period before submitting it elsewhere.

Reprint rights: This is the resubmitted piece I mention in the first rights definition. There is no limit to the number of times you can sell reprint rights. Be sure to indicate this is a reprint in your query letter and where it appeared. Some publishers will not take reprints and unpleasant problems arise if you fail to mention this.

E-book rights: Although most book publishers are including these rights in the initial contract asking for all rights, some are not. If you retain the e-book rights, you can self-publish the same book as an e-book yourself or sell the e-book rights to another publisher. I’m sure you can see why most publishers keep those rights. You can also publish a backlist title in e-book. A backlist title is a book you already published, perhaps now out-of-print and the rights have been returned to you.

Movie-rights: This is a fun one. Movie rights can mean nothing in a contract if your novel is never optioned for a movie. But if it is—be sure you have an agent ready to negotiate those rights. By the way, optioning for movie rights is not the same as a contract for making a movie. It means I’ll pay you a little something to hang onto the idea of making your book into a movie. They hang onto the option for a few years until they decide to do it or circular file the idea.

How does a book author get paid?

There are three ways a writer can be paid for their book.

  1. Flat fee: a set amount of money paid on contract signing that you get to keep. The amount doesn’t change no matter if the book is a best seller or a flop.
  2. Royalties: a small amount paid to you for every book sold
  3. Advance against royalties: Money paid to you on signing a contract with a promise of more royalties should the book do well. They have a standard based on marketing research on what those sales numbers would be.

Advance against royalties is the most desirable. Here’s how that works. If the target is 20,000 (This a number I pulled out of the air) you will not receive a royalty check until after 20,001 books are sold.

Many small publishers only pay royalties. There is no advance, you receive royalties starting with book one. Royalties are usually paid semi-annually or annually. Some publishers may pay more often.

There have been a few sad occasions when publishers have demanded their advance back if a book sells poorly. Again, an agent or lawyer would catch those points and probably negotiate a better deal.

If your book never sells beyond the publisher’s established minimum expectations you will never see royalties.

What are residuals?

Residuals are continuous payments for your work. As long as your book is selling. These can come from international sales (books translated into other languages for example.)

Seek Legal help if you don’t understand your rights in a contract.

The key to insuring you don’t get tripped up over royalties, advances and rights is to have an agent. Unless you are a contract lawyer or an agent, don’t negotiate the contract on your own. Agents will be able to wade through the pages of information and point out areas of concern. Smaller manuscripts such as articles have smaller contracts you can usually understand without a lawyer. But then again, as I mentioned earlier, I had to consult a lawyer.

I know it is hard, but don’t be in such a hurry to get a contract for publication that you sign on the dotted line without paying close attention. Another example: a script that is purchased on spec can be tied up for years. At the end of that time it may never be produced.

The greeting card contract I signed took two years for the publisher to decide whether to use my verses. After two years they returned them to me. That was two years I couldn’t submit my work elsewhere.

I am learning to weigh which rights I am truly comfortable giving to publishers on any given project. I am more agreeable to small or no compensation from start-up publications than from well-established ones with a readership in the thousands especially if they sell advertising. If they want all rights that is a deal breaker.

Educate yourself as much as you can and seek advice from others more experienced. Again I place my disclaimer here: I am no expert.

So go forth, submit, and decide which rights are right for you.

Do you have anything else to add regarding royalties and rights? I’d like to hear your thoughts.

 

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Conference Tip # 6 Practice Your Pitch

baseball-1

Practicing your writing pitch until its smooth is another key to get attention for your manuscript.

Preparing and doing a pitch is probably my least favorite thing to do. I find it hard to memorize and say it smoothly. There. I’ve admitted it to everyone. I love being a character on stage. I’m pretty comfortable with public speaking, I am the one nominated on mission trips to break the ice with the natives. But giving my pitch. My mind goes blank or the pitch comes out anything but perfect. Why? No idea. Maybe unlike a play where I am another character, this statement is all about me and my work. Promoting myself is hard for me.

Parts of a pitch

First you need a hook—a sentence to grab attention. Characters or topic and a final sentence to bring out the response: tell me more. A pitch is a few sentences stating what your novel, non-fiction or article is about. Often referred to as an elevator pitch because it needs to be short enough to share with someone before the elevator doors open at your destination. A pitch is like an oral business card. You want to have it with you to give when you have an opportunity.

The pitch needs to encapsulate your story. It should evoke questions. It should cause the editor to catch your idea, be intrigued and toss around the idea with you for a while.

Personalize your pitch

Spend time writing your pitch. Use words you are comfortable with. If a fifty dollar word gets hung up on your tongue use a simpler one. It should sound conversational not like a commercial.

Practice your pitch

Look in the mirror and recite it to yourself until you can say it over and over again without thinking about it. If you stumble reword it so you don’t. Recite it to others—your spouse, critique group, even your dog. The more you recite it, the more natural it will become. While practicing your pitch in the mirror think of follow-up questions and how you will answer them. Formulate an answer to each one. It will boast your confidence.

When to pitch

You will need your pitch when you have an appointment. It’s a quick way to get the ball rolling. It can lead to sharing your first chapter.

When you sit at the lunch table with an editor you don’t have an appointment with, you can share your pitch. (Agents, publishers, editors expect you to pitch them at lunch.) Some will ask everyone at the table about their projects. If you stutter and ramble and backtrack, it reeks of newbie and it is rude to the others at the table who hope to share their pitch as well.

If you are having a meal with other writers, ask to share your pitch both for practice and feedback. They may share their pitch with you and together you can encourage each other.

Examples

Here are examples of my latest pitches. I change them every year trying to make them smoother. As I said, I struggle with pitches. I feel very vulnerable sharing them with you. They are not as stellar as others’ pitches, but perhaps they will serve as a guide to creating your own. I suggest googling writers’ pitches to find some really cool ones.

My Historical pitch

Secrets and Charades finds Evangeline Olson’s shameful secret catching up with her through an unwanted inheritance. Fleeing west as a mail-order bride seemed the best solution. Jake Marcum needs a woman to gentle his tomboy niece. A female doctor is more than he bargained for and exactly what he needs. Together they must wade through secrets and a few unexpected charades to save his ranch and her heart.

My Contemporary pitch.

New Duet takes the reader on a journey of healing. After the sudden death of her abusive husband during a worship service, Isabella is shrouded in guilt and desperate to find her pre-marriage self. Wounded warrior Dan is looking for normal in a civilian world with the help of his service dog. Normal seems impossible when he’s missing a leg, some fingers and PTSD brings on panic attacks. Isabella is startled by her attraction to Dan after her late husband stripped away every vestige of Isabella’s former life including her name. Dan hopes his new normal includes Isabella in his life.

My Article pitch

I am a sandwich. My life is sandwiched between helping with grandchildren under six and parents in their eighties. Both are childlike in their responses to life. Yet, neither can be handled the same. When my sandwich is slipped into a Panini press of trials, my heart struggles to seek God’s grace in the midst of it all.

None of these pitches are as perfect as I would like them. I’ll be working to make them better. But I hope the examples will help you. And if you stumble through your pitch like me, smile and hand out your sell sheet. Works for me.

After the pitch

If your pitch results in “Tell me more,” have your sell-sheet or summary ready to pass over. Be prepared to share your first page. Bring the entire first chapter just in case. Share the completed article.

Don’t ramble on about your subject. Don’t explain why it is the greatest thing since sliced bread. Again it screams newbie and unprofessional. Only answer the questions asked. Smile, be as enthusiastic as you can.

If your pitch results in crickets don’t resort to filling the silence with rambling information. This rarely happens. If you get less than an enthusiastic response, move on to the next pitch if you have one. Otherwise thank him/her for their time and shake their hand. Remember not everyone is going to find your pitch intriguing. But if at the end of the conference you find your pitch wasn’t achieving your goal, ask other writers for input as to how to make it better for the next time.

If you have any questions about pitching your book or want to share your own success story please comment. I love to hear from readers.

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Conference Tip # 4 Synopsis and Proposals

Two great proposal writing books from my library. There are sections in each focusing on writing a synopsis.

Two great proposal writing books from my library. There are sections in each focusing on writing a synopsis.

You’ve made your business card and you may or may not have opted for a sell sheet. Another option is a synopsis of your book. A more complete presentation of your project is a proposal. It is a sell sheet on steroids containing pages and pages of information. Let me give a brief description of these and let you decide if you want to bring them to the conference.

Synopsis

A synopsis or summary condenses your entire book content to as few words as possible. The goal of a synopsis is the same as a sell sheet—to get interest in your project during appointments. This must be concise, complete and compelling. You should know your story well enough to tell it without rambling. As you write your first draft, you will probably put in too much detail and it will run much too long. Once it is complete, cut all unnecessary words and rabbit trails. Then trim, trim, trim all words that drag or distract. The synopsis is the first impression of your writing skills so make it stellar. Be sure to have others critique it for grammar, spelling and any other error that give you black marks rather than stars. Try to keep it to a page, no more than a page and a half. A well-written synopsis should promote discussion about your project and you. And ultimately a request for a proposal.

Proposal

A request for a proposal used to mean you handed it over at the conference. Some editors still take hard copies of proposals. Most do not. Email as an attachment is now the norm. Hauling home lots of paper proposals, especially on a plane, is not practical. Often the request will be accompanied by a guidelines sheet. Follow it to the letter.

There are lots of books with step by step examples of how to put together a proposal. A proposal has many components. A proposal for fiction has slightly different requirements than non-fiction. Pay attention to details. If you are on a time crunch, put writing the proposal aside as a to-do after the conference, especially if you are a newbie. You will find  proposal writing books for sale at the conference. Check for conference class offerings; often how to write a proposal is listed.

If you want to take a proposal, you don’t need many—one maybe two. (Again most requests will be for email versions.) The advantage of a completed proposal before the conference is ease of submitting after the conference. Be sure you review the guideline sheet and customize each proposal to match each publisher’s request. (Be sure to send a proposal to each person who asked you as soon as you can after the conference.) You will find that most requests follow the same format, but some may have a few additional components. You might want to create a template to follow for all future proposals.

Here are the basic components of a proposal

  • A Cover Sheet

A single page, single spaced, specific format containing your title, word count, name and contact information and agent information (if you have one). Sometimes it contains a pitch line. (One line about the book.)

  • Synopsis

Generally single spaced, 1 ½ to three pages long. Be sure to tell the ending so publisher can see how the story plays out.

  • Writer’s biography

Single space description written in third person with a photo.

  • Sample chapters

Usually double spaced. Always the first three chapters or first fifty pages.

  • Comparison titles.
  • Similar books to yours. How yours is the same yet different.
  • Chapter Outline

Usually this is for non-fiction. An outline gives the publisher a good idea of where you are going with your subject matter. Sometimes a publisher wants a chapter by chapter synopsis of fiction.

  • Marketing

Include a marking page of what you can and will do to help sell your book.

  • Audience

Who are your target readers? Women, young adults, history buffs, theologians? Everyone is not an acceptable answer. Ex: Women who want to get away to pioneer days for the weekend will enjoy this book.

  • Genre

Publishers want to know what genre your book falls into. They are always looking for books in genres their company is light in. Here is a short general list. There are lots of subgenres and genre definitions change. Contemporary Romance, Contemporary, Historical, Women’s Fiction, Mystery/Suspense, Romantic Suspense, Young Adult, Children, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Western and the list goes on. For non-fiction you might list Christian Living, Self Help, Devotional, Bible Study, and Health. Your book might fall into more than one category.

Take your time

As you can see, a proposal takes time to put together well. If you are a newbie and your conference is a few weeks away, you might want to forgo the proposal and focus on the summary and other tools. It is better to attend the proposal class, buy the how-to book and get some critiquers to look over your proposal after a request has been made. A well-done proposal following the specific editor’s guidelines has a better chance of getting off the slush pile. If you have time to do a proper proposal in advance of the conference, I would remind you to make it stellar with no grammar or spelling errors. (I know I say this a lot.) Make each word count. Your writing is judged on how well you write your proposal.

Here are two links to books on writing proposals. Each one has details on synopsis writing as well.

http://www.amazon.com/Write-Perfect-Book-Proposal-That/dp/0471353124/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1431175377&s

http://www.amazon.com/Book-Proposals-Made-Easy-nonfiction-ebook/dp/B00VAN8LDO/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1431175449&sr=8-14&keywords=writing+book+proposal

What success have you had in sharing your synopsis at a conference? Have you had a request for a proposal? I’d love to hear your experience.

 

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Why You Should Attend Writers Conferences Part 1

Rowena Kuo is one of the wonderful editors full of encouragement for writers that I meet at Write-to-Publish.

Rowena Kuo is one of the wonderful editors full of encouragement for writers that I meet at Write-to-Publish.

Right in the middle of Speedbo I have no time to blog. So today and Wednesday I am reposting two post about Writers Conferences. A subject near and dear to my heart. My first conference changed my whole attitude about myself as a writer. So, here you go. Hope the reminder helps encourage you to attend one.

Serious Writers Attend Conferences

Every time I attend a writing conference I am reminded of why I write. My encouragement to every writer, no matter their age or experience, is to attend conferences. There is never a time in your writing career that you evolve out of writing conferences. It is a place to hone your craft and network with other like-minded people.

Basic reasons for attending

You gain knowledge of the business of writing through workshops and classes which cover a variety of subjects. Basic techniques for writing non-fiction and fiction books are usually offered. Classes are available on subjects ranging from writing articles to creating a stellar proposal. The opportunity to have appointments with publishers, editors and agents to pitch your story or idea is worth the price of the conference. Many of these editors, publishers and agents will not take any unsolicited submissions. But if you meet them at a conference, your pitch may garner you an open invitation to submit.

Arthor Cynthia Ruchti not only was such a wonderful encouragement on my writng journey but she autographed her novel for me.

Arthor Cynthia Ruchti not only was such a wonderful encouragement on my writing journey but she autographed her novel for me.

Networking

Conferences are a networking opportunity to meet other writers and be encouraged. One writer might direct you to a particular publisher who is seeking what you are writing. Established writers may give you personal introductions to the professionals you are seeking appointments with. Fledgling writers ask questions of other writers and get the encouragement and direction needed to turn their scribbles into successful submissions. You’ll discover writers who live in your area or a local writer’s group to join.

Encouragement

This is the place where everyone speaks your language. No one rolls their eyes when you say you’ve written a novel. You can practice your pitch with other writers before you pitch it at your appointment. Most conferences have critique groups of your peers to help you improve your writing. Unlike Aunt Sally who loves everything you write, they can tell you of any red flags in your writing that need fixing. That kind of encouragement makes the road to publication easier. The keynote speakers remind writers of their calling. A writer’s revival if you will, that helps each writer refocus. Rekindling the confidence that has been chipped away by editors’ rejections and life happens interruptions.

Lifelong Friendships

Every time you attend a conference you make new friends and reconnect with old ones. Writer friends add dimension to your life and open doors. Becoming friends with publishers that may not be interested in what you are writing now plants your name in their mind when the publisher’s needs change. Acquisition Editors change publishing houses, agents may open their own company. Having made their acquaintance puts you in a good position to become a client. Writer friends share the link to your new book or article on their blog, website or facebook page. Let’s not forget they are there when you feel stomped on by life and misunderstood in the industry.

Budget attending one conference a year

Serious writers know this is an important business expense. Decide on the conference you plan to attend early and put money aside in your budget for it. If your finances are so tight you can’t fit the cost in a monthly budget, apply for scholarships or grants. Conferences will offer a limited number of scholarships, either full or partial to attendees. Some offer work scholarships for locals who help with the preconference preparation. Do a Google search for writer’s grants or reference the Writer’s Market Guide and the Christian Writer’s Market Guide to pursue grant leads. The e-newsletter Funds for Writers has grant information in every issue.

Locate a conference near you

The Sally Stuart Conference Guide http://stuartmarket.com/Conferences.aspx is a great resource for finding the conference that is right for you.tion in every issue.

Why do you attend conferences?

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