Tips for choosing the best social media platform to sell your books

I attended a Serious Writer’s retreat two weeks ago with speakers Cyle Young and Michelle Medlock Adams. It was chockful of helpful information.  I want to share with you a few tidbits I learned over the next few posts. Today I’ll mention social media and genre. Deciding which social media platforms to be on is so confusion. Someone will say all of them, while others say pick one and do it well. I learned a few tips to help me focus. Genre and your target audience play a big part.

LinkedIn is for those looking for freelance work. Many corporations have websites and need bloggers. There are people looking for ghost writers and you can find experts on subjects for any article assignments you may have. If you write fiction it’s a good place to get writing assignments that pay well to supplement your income.

Facebook If you write women’s fiction, children’s books and even things that appeal to men focus your time here. Statistically, women buy the most books. Moms and grandmothers buy the majority of books for children through middle school.  They not only buy for their children, grandchildren but their husbands as well.  Non-fiction books on a variety of subjects can be promoted here too. For the same reason, women make most book purchases. You want to be where people are more likely to spend money.

Twitter is considered the best place to meet editors, publishers and other authors. Also, if this is your favorite social media and you have lots of followers, this can work for promoting your books. I’ve heard of authors selling a large quantity of books by having a large twitter following.

Instagram is for YA authors because young people aren’t on Facebook, they consider it their parent’s social media.  YA readers are active on this site. YA authors have a better chance to find followers and promote their books on Instagram. Don’t forget Instagram is a picture, video driven media. Memes are big on this platform. There are tutorials with tips to promote on this media. Google them.

Pinterest is a great place to promote cookbooks, craft books and any do-it-yourself books. How many cool ideas have you found when you’re remodeling or searching for a new recipe? This leads to sales as you offer fun pics and videos around your books.  Building character boards for your fiction is a nice way to introduce your book to the world. You can link to your sales platform. It’s a nice addition for fiction, but it’s not the premiere spot for sales.

Not everyone will agree with these suggestions because you may have found your sales niche in a platform other than those recommend above for your genre. These guidelines will help you not waste time on media that won’t find the audience you need.  The larger your followers, the larger your platform for sales.

Remember the 1 in 6 rule. Post one buy my book post for every six posts on social media. The other five should be memes, photos and stuff that interest you even other authors books. Then you are not beating your followers to death with a sales pitch.

Hope you found these tips helpful.

What social media has worked best for you?

 

 

 

Entitled to Sell Part 2

Today is  the second half of Lynne Pleau’s blog post that gives tips on writng great titles. Part 1 showed us the various types of titles. Part 2 is the how-to portion. Take it away Lynne.

Entitled to Sell, Part 2

By Lynne Pleau

Originally published in the Christian Communicator, May 2006

and on the ACFW Blog, February 20-21, 2019.

Getting Creative

In Entitled to Sell, Part 1, I showed you some different ways titles become memorable. Now let’s look at how do you create them.

Start by defining your theme. In one sentence, capture what your piece is about.

Next, define what you want your title to say about your piece. Jot down anything that comes to mind. This is a right-brained activity, so turn off your inner critic. One idea will spark another.

For example, when I worked on the title for my short story about a middle-aged woman who reflects on the emotional cost of having stolen a gold-toned ring, I wrote down the phrases, “guilt is no bargain,” “guilt is too expensive,” and “paying the cost.” These three phrases led me to “ring of guilt,” which eventually became the story’s title, Ring of Gilt.

        It doesn’t matter when in the development of your story or article you start this process. Sometimes examining the theme of your story or article while you’re writing it can help you focus your ideas. I started the titling process early in the draft phase of Ring of Gilt, and, as a result, came up with an idea that made the ending of the story much more powerful.

And don’t worry if the right title doesn’t come to you right away. Keep your ideas handy. Sometimes when you come back to the list later you’ll see something you didn’t before. For an article with the theme of “how life experience affects how a character speaks,” I came up with the following phrases: “What are they thinking?” “Saying it the way they see it.” “Voicing through experience.” Several days later, I came back to the list, and with a little tweaking, came up with the title “The Voice of Experience.”

Tools of the Trade

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From your expanded list of title ideas, pick out key phrases and look up their synonyms. using a hard-bound thesaurus for this process can give you more options, and scrolling from page to page may give you ideas you wouldn’t catch on-line. Keep an eye out for words that are alliterative or rhyme, and for combinations that echo well-known phrases.51l4qdV0vEL._SX303_BO1,204,203,200_

Define your key words using the dictionary. You may discover something about a word’s meaning you hadn’t thought of, something that will lead you to another idea.

Next, try the rhyming dictionary. This time, look for alliterative possibilities by scanning words that start with the same letter as your key words.

Here’s how I used these tools for the title of this article. The theme is “How to create catchy titles.” Since this is an informative, non-fiction article, I knew I wanted to include the word “title.” I started a list of theme ideas. “Searching for titles.” “Creative titles.” “Creating titles.” “Finding the right title.” “How to create titles.”

Then I worked with the thesaurus, looking for the words related to “title” and “search” and came up with the synonyms: bestselling, signature, query, quest, seek. This lead to a few ideas I hadn’t thought of: Title Search, Bestselling Titles, Creating Killer Titles, Title Quest. Any of these would have worked, but I kept going.

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Next, I used the rhyming dictionary for title: Idol, tidal, idle, vital. Hmm. Not very helpful. Then I went to the dictionary for alliterative possibilities: Tang: Title Tang. Trap: The Title Trap. Tell: The Telling Title. Talent: Title Talent. Terrible: The Terrible TitleTopsy-Turvy Titles, Taming the Title, Down the Toilet Title, Title Bomb. Okay. Got a little punchy.

When I came back to the list later, I had just seen a commercial about a video store, and the idea for Blockbuster Titles came to me.

But I still wasn’t satisfied. I went back to the dictionary and looked up the definition of the word “title,” and under the verb form of that word, I found the definition “to entitle.” Entitle, I read, means both “to give a title to” and “to give a right to demand or receive.” Entitled to what? To sell! I knew I’d found what I was looking for.

The goal is to spark ideas. Write your ideas down. Keep them handy. And always be on the lookout for other writers’ successful titles.

Finding the right title for your writing takes creative effort, but it’s worth it.

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Lynne Pleau Bio:

Lynne Pleau has published over 60 articles, reviews, poetry, and flash fiction in publications like Marriage Partnership Magazine, War Cry, Christian Communicator, Havok, Splickety, and Spark. She is a multiple flash fiction award winner.

I loved her process for creating titles. Thank you Lynn for your expertise. Let’s have a little fun. Share any titles from your recent works. I’d love to hear them. I’ll start.

My upcoming novella that releases in August as part of Smitten Historical Romance Collection:The Cowboy  is entitled Healing Hearts. Now it’s your turn.