Addicted to Books and Unashamed

I’m addicted to reading and unashamed. October is National Read-a-Book Month. That makes me sad. Reading only one book. It should be read lots of books. My healthy addiction has expanded my mind and relaxed me at the end of a hectic day.

Books spark the imagination in ways movies and video games never can.

 

An author’s superpower should be reading. Not just for enjoyment. Grab a book in a genre that’s trending or craft books to expand your knowledge of writng and the publishing world. And the research you find in books will fuel your writing superpower.

 

From a reader’s perspective we savor words, whether it’s a wonderful quote or a great turn of a phrase. Books transport the reader to places they’ve never been before.

 

I enjoy the history channel and documentaries, but nothing compares to reading the historical tomes and biographies to glean the knowledge for myself.

I believe the adage: the book is always better than the movie.

Reading touches the creative part of the brain forcing it to imagine what a character looks like or a setting based on the description.  Ever see the movie version of a book and be disappointed in who plays your favorite character?

 

Imaginations that are feed and nurtured through reading produce great inventions, a desire to explore new frontiers, and best-selling novels.

 

From my reading addiction point of view everyone should read at least one book a month. And writers should read at least one a week. Stimulating our brains with the written word and opening our mind’s eye to new concepts and perspectives whether we read, non-fiction or fiction, fantasy or biographies we will bring something new to our lives that we would have missed if we’d not journeyed through the pages of a book.

 

Have you ever read a biography that gave you a new insight into the time period of the historical character, something you didn’t learn in school? Have you ever enjoyed a classic novel, poetry or even Shakespeare, free of tests and analysis into the psyche of the author? How about curling up under a blanket and be whisk away to another time or a new universe? An author’s ability to make me feel a part of the story gives me joy.

Do you see now in my ramblings why I feel my addiction to reading has value and National Read-a-Book month should be changed to Read-a lot-of-Books month.

How about you are you an addict too?

What is your favorite kind of book to read?

 

Evangeline with the Burgundy Hair : Creating A Heroine

burgundy hair 2

Monday I shared how Jake the hero in my novel, Secrets and Charades came to be. Today I’d like to introduce the heroine by her most startling feature—her hair. How to describe Evangeline’s hair color was a challenge. I could picture it so clearly in my mind’s eye. A girl I went to high school with had the most beautiful red hair, but it wasn’t red like Lucille Ball or Carol Burnett. It was more…more burgundy. Evangeline is the heroine and strong-willed mail order bride to my determined cowboy Jake. She has green eyes but no freckles. Her skin is peaches and crème. You know, porcelain skin with just enough blush on her cheeks to draw attention to her eyes. But she’s tall for a woman in the 1870s and a doctor to boot. A rare combination for the time and not a desirable mate for most men.

Evangeline is compassionate, determined and intelligent. She’s strives for independence and surrounds herself with a cloak of confidence. Beneath it all is a deep-seated fear that creeps out of the shadows to taunt any happiness she might reach for.

1870s woman

I wanted Evangeline to look different than the many heroines I’ve read about lately. I wanted her to have an unusual hair color and height not common for a woman of the era. No actress came to mind when I created her. She appeared before me complete with her own history and begged for her story to be told. She has not change one iota from the first moment she revealed herself to me. Jake on the other hand grew a mustache and sported a scar on his cheek after our first encounter.

Evangeline represents those women who feel their past has so tainted them they can never consider marriage as a path for their lives. Evangeline’s journey mirrors so many woman who still hang onto the past like a badge of dishonor that they fear others will discover and then reject them.

Her unique burgundy hair represents how she views herself. Different from other women. Stained, yet, her past has shaped her into the strong woman she is. Her whole existence is to help readers who can relate to her find closure and completeness. The 1870s were a less forgiving time and society’s view of women much more controversial.

Her painful past haunts her and colors how she responds to her new life. It’s a time to face her fears and grow into the woman she was meant to be and find love in the midst of it all.

If you were writing an unusual female character what would set her apart? Tell me in a comment below.

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