A Writer’s Thankful List

Writer's thankful list

Writing requires getting words on a page. Lots of words on a page is what we do. At times it can be a thankless pursuit. In order to refocus my mind from the attitude “this is too hard” to “I am having fun” I created a thankful list in no particular order of importance.

  1. I am thankful for computers and spell check.

When I first began this writing journey it was with a typewriter, carbon paper and white out. Bleh!!!

 

  1. I am thankful for the internet.

Research questions answers a key stroke away. I love the library but not leaving the house is golden.

 

  1. I am thankful for writing blogs.

So much information and encouragement to remind me I am a writer.

 

  1. I am thankful for e-mail.

No more sending proposals and query letter snail mail. No additional expenses to send my manuscript to several publishers at once.

 

  1. I am thankful for social media.

Connecting with my fans and other authors is wonderful.

 

  1. I am thankful for reviews.

Good, bad or quizzical. They remind me that real people read my words.

 

  1. I am thankful for my critique group.

Without my Word Weaver partners, I would still be unpublished.

 

  1. I am thankful for the friendships I’ve forged with fellow-writers.

They’ve mentored, encouraged and opened doors for me.

 

  1. I am thankful for a supportive family who brag about me to their friends.

Making me feel so loved.

 

  1. Most importantly, I am thankful to Jesus for the gift of words.

 

What’s on your thankful list?

 

      

 

Home from the Conference Now What?

Clip board do list

Now that you’re home from your writer’s conference, it’s time to get organized. While you are decompressing that first day back, take time to send thank you notes. Yes, thank-you notes are still in vogue even though they may be electronic ones.

Thank you notes

Send them to all the people you had appointments with, thanking them for their time. You could send a note to the conference organizer and the instructors whose classes you attended. Gratefulness is an attribute every writer should practice. We all know how good it makes us feel to be thanked and appreciated. Go forth and do likewise.

Send stuff

If anyone requested information you mentioned you had (not proposals), send it now. It is easy to get busy and forget, and when you see them next at a conference, it will be awkward and embarrassing.

Request stuff

Some teachers will say, “If you email me, I will send you my notes.” Or they might have a special email for submission not available at the conference. Be sure to email your request for those things right away. It may take them a little while depending on their schedule to get back to you.

Sort, friend and follow

Sort through the pile of business cards you collected, and if they are not a friend on FB, add them. Follow them on tweeter, and if you use Linkedin, make the connection. Add them to your email list. All those connections are golden.

Post comments and photos on social media. Tag you new friends in pics or mentioned them in your comments.

Organize and rewrite

Organize all your notes. Don’t just place the notebooks on a shelf without perusing pages. You may find you wrote a vital piece of contact information in the midst of your workshop notes. Search for web addresses and books mentioned by teachers, and transfer the info to another sheet. I had written proposal request information from an editor who didn’t have a handout on a page of my notebook. Good thing I found it.

Calendars and time

Time Management is mentioned many times and in many ways at conferences. Plan how you are going to conquer it. Write down your commitment. Get out your calendar (whether on paper or PC) and plot your writing projects. Set goals for completion and days, hours, minutes you plan to write to reach those goals. You don’t want to let a whole year pass and conference time rolls around and you still haven’t submitted to all those who requested your work. Be sure to plan time to edit the things editors and critique groups suggested.

Read and Listen

Go through the books and CDs you purchase and plan when you will read and listen. If you commute to work, you can make that a classroom time with your CDs. Most writers are avid readers so I’m sure you know when your primo reading time is.

Do it now to gain success

The sooner you do these things the more like a writer you are going to feel. The discipline of reaching your conference goals builds confidence. Confidence is just another step toward the success you desired when you attended the conference in the first place.

What’s the first task you do when you come home from a conference?

 

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