Interview with Missionary Author Nancy Kelley Alveraz

Nancy Kelley Alveraz has stopped by for a visit today.  I am happy to have her here. She is serving as a missionary in the Philippines, a place near to my heart. Her novel The Butterfly Impact is set in the Philippines. I love the idea of giving American readers a sense of what the world is like outside our borders while sharing your heroine’s story.  

I’ve got sweet rice and Tang to commemorate the day. Two of the often-served treats when my hubby and I ministered there. So, let’s settle in and get on with our interview.

Nancy, tell us about yourself.

100_3837

Nancy Kelley Alveraz

 

I grew up in a suburb of Detroit, Michigan but also lived in Wheaton, Illinois and Orlando, Florida. I came to know the Lord when I was a teenager crying out to God for purpose and love. He responded in a slow and steady way to bring me to the place where I could understand His love and purpose. The church I attended taught me much about mission work and my heart was drawn to helping others know Him.

After college, I was asked to go to the Philippines as a short-term missionary which stretched to 3 yrs. I fell in love with the people and my eyes were opened to how many people around the world live in poverty. I knew God was calling me to continue on this journey. After graduate school and 4 years in Japan I ended up back in the Philippines as a 39 yr old. I struggled as a single missionary but God had special plans for me. And that’s what the book is about.

003

Nancy and her husband.

 

Tell us a bit about your novel.

Raina made a mess of her life. Now guilt and grief follow her everywhere. While picking up the pieces of her life God calls her to take His love and truth to others—in a distant land. Can she cope with a new culture, language, home and friends? Or will her insecurities drag her deeper into loneliness.

As a caterpillar goes through the metamorphosis from worm to delicate butterfly so is the journey from a shameful past to living in the freedom God intended. It can be a tortuous process . . . but for Raina, it’s worth it!

Laugh, cry and rejoice with Raina as God’s healing love gives her courage to do more than she ever dreamed possible.

This fictionalized story is based on real life events

 

What prompted you to write Butterfly Impact?

I wanted to give God the glory for the wonderful things He did in my life. I also want people to see how God can take a shy, ordinary girl with weaknesses and failures and use her for His purposes. This is my story, a fictionalized version.

What do you hope readers take away from your story?

When we fall we should not lose hope. Difficulties are God’s opportunity for growth and unexpected outcomes. Don’t be afraid to take risks if God is leading you.

 

Do you have other books or WIP you’d like to mention?

My husband and I are involved in an Oral Bible Story ministry with Cru International (formerly Campus Crusade for Christ) called Story Runners and we bring Bible stories to people of different cultures in Southeast Asia and train nationals to reach out to unreached people groups through this oral culture method. I also have a huge passion for those oppressed through human trafficking and all its ugliness. So I’ve combined the two and compiled stories from the Bible and modern-day stories into a Bible study booklet called Life Hope.

Give my reader’s one piece of writing advice you’ve found invaluable.

Don’t lose the magic of writing by worrying about all the technical do’s and don’ts.

More about Nancy Kelley Alvarez:

Nancy Kelley Alvarez refuses to let her introverted personality keep her from sharing with others God’s stories of love and truth. Starting in college she stepped out in faith to go where God called her and she hasn’t stopped yet.

She serves with Cru International in a ministry called Story Runners, telling God’s amazing stories and training others to share them with those who would otherwise have no access to His Word. Her passion for women, especially those touched by human trafficking, drives her to find creative ways to reach out. She and her husband Al, live in Quezon City, Philippines with their sweet little dog Bingo. Look for the next book in this series, coming soon.

 

I’ve so enjoyed getting to know you. How can my readers find you?

Facebook: Nancy Kelley Alvarez

Email: pnalvarez@yahoo.com

If you’d like to order Butterfly Impact click on the link below.

Concept1

https://www.amazon.com/Butterfly-Impact-Unexpected-Courage-Transformation-ebook/

If you’d like to receive Jubilee Writer in your email please register. Thanks so much for coming along with me. My readers mean a lot to me.

 

 

 

Advertisements

A Visit with Author Lynn Cornell

Lynn Cornell-2I am so excited to welcome my friend and fellow member of my Word Weaver Aurora group to my blog today. He has been a faithful member and participant since our critique group formed. His insights have been so helpful. Now it’s my turn to pay it forward.

Lynn Cornell released his first novel last month. The Color of Redemption tackles racism from a different perspective. I so enjoyed reading the story of Katie Smith and her journey toward forgiveness.

Here is the back cover blurb.

Raising her family in the turbulent ‘60s in a segregated rural Alabama town, Katie Parker understood the ugliness of racism and Jim Crow all too well. Her farm, which she shared with her activist husband, became her oasis, her retreat. Here, she had control. Here, she could witness God’s handiwork in the beauty of the land. Here, she was at peace. But it was a peace soon to be shattered. After a devastating and horrible event, Katie moves with three of her four children to a relative’s house in a majority-white suburb of Los Angeles. Settling in, she was confident she had escaped the horrors of her hometown. But the memory of that horrible event, and the animosity and hatred it stirred in her, were not easily shaken. Though she escaped a segregated Southern town, racism and intolerance were not easily left behind. Oddly enough, it was her granddaughter’s addiction to drugs that led Katie on a path causing her to confront her fears and prejudices and face head-on the past that she thought she had left behind. Katie’s journey will introduce this generation to the ugly racism of the sixties and confront the racial realities that exist in the church today. The Color of Redemption will show readers how to break down these walls that separate Christians and deal with racial prejudice, not from a civil rights perspective, but a Christian world view dictated by the Bible.

 

I love that you wrote this in first person. Following the story from Katie’s perspective added so much depth. I haven’t read a story like this and so I want to start out by asking:  Why this book?

I have been a Christian since 1978. I’ve been a part of all black churches and all white churches (my presence at white churches excluded). I’ve found it troubling that the same racial feelings and opinions that exists in America exists in both churches. The Color of Redemption shows how Christians should view and resolve racial issues.

How did you research to get the clothing right? The setting? And dialect?

As a young boy, I spent summers in a small southern town and worked cotton fields to buy my school clothes. The color divide was marked by railroad tracks dividing the white side of town from the black side of town. I also lived in Los Angeles and found the racial divide marked not by railroad tracks, but by area of the city or suburb.

Who coached you on how a woman talks and thinks. You really nailed it.

That’s funny because I just picture in my mind how women I know would speak and react to situations. Of course, I get feedback from writer’s group, i.e. you, and I’ll ask my wife and daughter how something sounds.

I’ve heard you share your journey to publication. So, encourage my readers by answering these two important questions

 How long did it take you to get it published?

About ten years

What were some of the obstacles?

I think the biggest obstacle was learning how to write. I had written an entire first draft of COR and didn’t know what things like point of view or show and not tell were. Once I had taken the time to learn the craft of writing, the story came together and I was, with confidence, able to seek publishing.  I think some publishers were hesitant to tackle the issue of race. I had to have patience to find the publisher who was willing to publish my book.

We always end the journey in a better place than we began. Share some of the things you learned along the way?

The most significant thing I learned is Christians who view life through a racial prism fail to see the wonderful work of the cross. That’s the cure of racism.

What words of wisdom would you pass on to newbie writers?

I can’t say this enough, learn the craft of writing. Take the time to hone your skills. Then learn the publishing business, and yes, it is a business. With those two things, you’ll have confidence as a writer and in what you’ve written.

Lynn, tell us about your upcoming projects.

Currently I’m working on two novels, A Most Precious Pearl which tells the story of an immoral woman who discovers she is God’s pearl. In God’s Honor tells the story of an Iranian secret police woman who comes to faith in opposition to her strong Muslim tradition.

Thank you so much for joining me today. I hope everyone takes to heart your advice to learn the craft. And I hope my readers will take the time to purchase this thought-provoking, timely story.  Click here.

 Color of Redemption

Lynn’s Bio:

Lynn Cornell has been a Christian since 1978 and started writing in his forties, at the request of his wife. He’s currently working on three novels and two non-fictions books. Lynn has completed a children’s book, Obi’s Three Nails and four screenplays. His screenplay Tiny Tim’s Christmas Carol received honorable mention in the Writer’s Digest competition.  The Color of Redemption was a semi-finalist in the Christian Writer’s Guild Operation First Novel contest. He is a member of Word Weavers.When not writing, he enjoys riding his bike. He’s been married to his wife, Beverly for twenty-three years and has five adult children and thirteen grandchildren. Visit him on Facebook.

If you would like to receive this blog in your email subscribe in the right-hand column.