Conference Tips: Double Checking and Final Thoughts

Double checking to be sure I haven't forgot anything before I leave for the conference.

Double checking to be sure I haven’t forgot anything before I leave for the conference.

Today is the first day of the Write-To-Publish Conference. I have spent the last few days making sure I have done everything I encouraged you all to do in my ten tips. I feel I’m as ready to as I can be to get full value out of this week’s conference.

I’m looking forward to reconnecting with old friends and making new ones. My tote bag contains all the tools I’ll need. Wait! I need to do a double check. Help me look through my bag to be sure I haven’t forgotten anything.

I’ve removed everything and we can repack it again following my previous conference tip posts.

  1. I have my special business card holder. Let’s look inside. I didn’t forget to put the business cards in there. (Hey, it’s happened before.)
  2. Multiple copies of my sell-sheets for my two novels. Check.
  3. Chapters and summaries (I opted to leave my proposals at home based on my research and experience at previous conferences.) Check.
  4. I have marked the workshops and classes I want to attend.
  5. I’ve done my research and know who I want an appointment with to pitch my stuff.
  6. I have printed copies of my writing clips from magazines, blog posts and e-zines.
  7. I’ve print off a variety of samples. Some I want to pitch and others just because you never know what you wish you’d brought along.
  8. I reviewed the dress code and made sure my wardrobe is appropriate. I’ve broken in my new shoes ahead of time, (Don’t want blisters.)
  9. My notepad and several pens are now safely tucked in my tote as well.
  10. I’ve practiced my pitches (well, you all know I hate doing them.) to try and make them sound smooth and natural.

So, looks like I’m ready. Wait I need to add an umbrella or rain parka; the weather is so unpredictable in Northern Illinois this time of year. I’ve made sure any bills due while I’m away are paid. All instructions for family left behind clearly defined. My phone charger added to my tote. If I were not commuting, I would be double checking my luggage and adding my laptop and its adapter to my pile to haul to the conference. I might opt to take it later in the week anyway.

Eyeballing everything one last time. Looks like I’m ready to go. I’m stoked and nervous even though this is my seventh year attending a conference. Next week I’ll post some highlights and new things I’ve learned.

If you are attending the Write to Publish Conference be sure to look me up. I love to connect with my readers.

Please sign up to follow my blog if you have found my tips helpful.

Conference Tip# 5 Do Your Research

 Do the research in advance. It's worth your time. Dreamtimes.com free stock photo.

Do the research in advance. It’s worth your time.
Dreamtimes.com free stock photo.

“Go! Learn things.” Leroy Jethro Gibbs, NCIS

Research before you attend a conference is a huge key to success. Go to the conference website click on each faculty member, agent, editor and publisher attending. Read, read, and read. Click on links directing you to their website. Read lots, learn stuff. What do they publish? Do you have something that fits their need? Print off the faculty page to circle, highlight, and take notes of those you wish to see.

After you learn stuff

Only make appointments with those people who are interested in your genre, article subject matter, or the idea you are pitching. Positive feedback and requests for your manuscripts are most likely to happen if you’ve done your research.

Most of the faculty will have a photo on the site. Having a copy with you will help you identify them between classes, break time, elevators and dining halls. Introduce yourself and briefly pitch your stuff. It’s not being rude. They expect conferencees to pitch to them outside of appointment schedules.

List those you wish to have appointments with by order of importance. You will only be allowed to make a few appointments. You’ll have to catch the rest on the fly.

Don’t forget panels

Attending panels at the conference furthers your research. Editor A does not list flash fiction for his magazine on his website but during a panel he mentioned he is now looking for it. Tada! You now can add him to your list of who you wish to contact.

Check your samples and clips

Look over the samples and clips you are taking to the conference. Decide in advance which ones you want to share during each appointment. Write more samples if an idea hits you while researching the needs of editors. It might be the perfect fit. Be sure it’s your best work.

Knowledge is power

So in conclusion-research, research, research. The more you know the less overwhelmed you will be at the conference.

Do you have any pre-conference research tips? Share them please.

 

Want to follow my blog? Click the link on your right.