12 Tips to prepare for interviews

Lawyers are always told never ask a question you don’t already know the answer too. And so it is when a writer is preparing for an interview. Here are tips to get you ready for just that.

  • Write out a series of questions about yourself and the book you will be promoting. Tailor them to various scenarios. Questions surrounding your writing journey, the what-if moment of your book, and how you got from page one to the end. Write out twenty questions knowing they will only ask a few of them.
  • Write out the answers to those questions. Then practice before a mirror answering those questions until the responses sound natural.
  • Often an interviewer will ask for a media kit. This is that lovely packet of info about you and your books. Include a series of suggested questions. Pick your favorite questions to include. This helps both of you to have a smooth interview.
  •  Having prepared a string of possible questions if the interviewer likes to interview off-the-cuff (I hate those) the answers you give will sound natural because they will more than likely be a variation on the list you prepared.
  • Practice your physical appearance. Sit up straight, don’t fidget, think about the position of your feet if you’re sitting. Do this before a mirror as well. If you can record yourself, you can correct things that might distract from your interview. I find myself wanting to itch my nose or push tiny strains of hair out of my face. It is very distracting on a video interview. While doing a radio interview, sit up straight and focus on the interview. Pretend the interviewer can see your face. I laid down part way through a podcast interview. When the interviewed aired, my voice dropped to almost a muffle at the point where I laid on the couch. UGH!!
  • Avoid filler words. If you ever took a speech class, you know what I mean. Rather than pause the speaker fills those spaces with Uh, you know, you know what I’m saying, ah, um and other slang word that become a distraction to the listener. After hearing a speech by the CEO of the company I used to work for, my co-worker had counted at least twenty times in his brief speech he’d said you know. Even though what he said was important, his pause words erased its value for that listener.
  • Talk slower. I talk fast, naturally. During a live interview, even a recorded one, you may find your voice speeding up, wanting to get every point in as quick as you can. Practice talking slower. Record yourself and listen to your pacing and pronunciation.
  • Don’t just focus on selling your book during the interview. Engage with your listeners. Save the last few minutes to give the audience the information needed for a purchase. If the interviewer asks if you have anything to add at the end of the interview, that is the perfect time to hold up your book, restate the title and give your buy links.
  • You don’t need to be perfect because your audience needs to feel they can connect with you. But you don’t want to sound so bad that it takes away from the message you want to get across. That’s why practicing the answers to your questions makes your conversation smoother.
  • Avoid profanity or words that may offend. Know your audience, you want to sound professional and prepared.
  • Know your audience so you can reach their felt need. As a romance writer, I don’t always focus on the romance elements in my books. I sold New Duet to a male veteran because my hero was a wounded warrior. I focused on the areas of my story that would appeal to my present listeners.
  • If the very idea of doing an interview terrifies you take a class. A public speaking class at your local community college is an option. There are organizations such as Toastmaster who can give you the tools you need to speak with confidence. Carol Kent’s Speak Up conference is a wonderful place to learn as well.

My last comment. Don’t be so critical of the details after hearing and seeing yourself in an interview that you crawl under your bed in humiliation. Each opportunity to share about your book you will get better. The interview I did where I laid down on my couch part way through to me sounded bad. I talked too fast and my voice wasn’t consistent. I was surprised to learn that interview was the most listened to podcast for three weeks running.

Do you have any tips to prepare for interviews? Share in the comments.

My novella Healing Hearts is part of this collection. It’s the prequel to my upcoming release Rescuing Her Heart. If you haven’t read The Cowboys here’s the link

Healing Heart

Lonnie Holt’s external scars remind him of his failures, his internal scars torment him. Genny Collins seeks safety at the ranch once owned by Lonnie’s uncle. When Lonnie and his brother arrive, sparks fly and distrust abounds. While Lonnie and Genny fight the love growing between them, his past haunts him, and her past pays them a visit.

Rescuing Her Heart is available for preorder.

As her husband’s evil deeds and abuse haunt a mail-order bride from the grave, can she learn to trust again and open her heart to true love?

On visitation rounds as a lay preacher, the last thing rancher Jed Holt expects is to be shot at from the barn next to a burned-down homestead. But the soot-covered woman hiding inside needs protecting, and Jed is the man to do it whether she likes it or not.

Delilah James’s nightmares began when she came to Kansas as a mail-order bride. Her husband was nothing like his letters. Now that he is dead, she can’t shake his abuse from her heart. Trusting men tops her never-again list, and taking a job on the Holt ranch as a housekeeper is a means to save money and bring her parents west. But her attraction to the compassionate former chaplain both angers and confuses her.

Jed has his own nightmares from a POW camp and understands Delilah better than she knows. Can two broken people form a forever bond?

Author Gail Kittleson: From Haphazard to Determined

Today I welcome Gail Kittleson to Jubilee Writer. I love hearing how other novelists got there start. Especially those who are in their jubilee years like me. Let’s get started.

gail

Tell my readers a little about your writing journey.

To be honest, uphill and haphazard describe the first decades of my writing journey. Without the self-confidence or sense of direction to apply myself to writing full-time, my journey barely existed at times. And yet, when I tried, I did experience some success—a few poems published in magazines, some short non-fiction books for current-issues classes, and a few professional teaching articles … even a co-written workbook for ESL learners.

But sporadic success wasn’t enough to motivate me to faithful attendance at my computer. About 15 years ago, I participated in a university writing retreat, and my journey’s adjectives switched. Now, determined and exciting are more accurate.

Somewhere along the way—maybe about a year ago, I finally became comfortable calling myself an author. Before that, it seemed too audacious to believe I really AM living my lifelong dream.

What is your latest published project.

With Each New Dawn, my third WWII novel, and the second in the Women of The Heartland series, took me deep into the heart of London during the relentless Nazi attacks. Researching this era parallels attempts to totally understand ourselves and the people around us—an endless saga. Click here to buy. 61gD-uoWs4L

 

How do you research for your books?

It’s a good thing I thrive on seeking information and connecting the dots. That’s what my research entails—studying timelines of the war and figuring out where certain situations or battles fit into my characters’ lives. First, I read textbooks. I’m quite old-fashioned about this, and a textbook account far outshines anything I find online. But if I do discover some tidbit online, it’s so fun to read more about it.

I also enjoy speaking with individuals who experienced the war. They’re becoming rare these days, but recently I met a woman who actually worked in her local rationing office. Talk about thrilling … somebody else in the group ran home to get their stash of little red “coins” given out as change when a rationing coupon was worth more than the purchased item.

And then another individual said, “I’ll be right back.” She returned with one of the missiles manufactured in a nearby factory. This, I’d say, is the most delightful type of research!

What inspired you to write With Each New Dawn?

The steadfast attitudes and actions of the Greatest Generation inspired me to write this book. People made-do with what was handed them, and that happened to be a very nasty war. They sacrificed time, talents, finances, and their husbands, sons, and daughters for the war effort. I focus on how women contributed, in a vast amount of roles. I don’t necessarily choose the most glamorous or exciting jobs—for example, one of my heroines works hard on the family farm, one becomes a grease monkey in her father’s shop when her brother is drafted, and one works at the Hormel plant, making SPAM for the troops.

Nothing glamorous about any of those jobs, but they’re taken straight from everyday women’s lives.

When did you realize your calling to create words on paper to share with the world?

This vocation came to me in adolescence, as clear as could be. If I could go back in time and give advice to that fearful girl, I’d say, “Use your gift—whatever it takes, use it!” Not that I didn’t want to use it—I did, passionately. But my fears blocked me for many, many years.

What is your favorite genre to read for fun?

Believe it or not, I read WWII fiction for fun. Let’s just say I have a one-track mind, and I can’t get enough of learning about the Greatest Generation. Right now I have two books going, and one I’m about to start. This never gets old!

Favorite verse…

So many verses have instructed me throughout life, but the poignant promise in Isaiah 63:9 has touched me over and over. In all their affliction He was afflicted, And the angel of His presence saved them; In His love and in His mercy He redeemed them, And He lifted them and carried them all the days of old.

Our Creator doesn’t just stand by when we’re distressed—he embraces our troubles. My heroine in With Each New Dawn discovers more about this very present God during her worst times.

Bio:

A late, bloomer, Gail Kittleson writes from her northern Iowa home. After instructing English as a Second Language and expository writing, she published a memoir, and now focuses on women’s historical fiction. She also facilitates writing workshops/retreats.

She and her husband enjoy their grandchildren and in winter, Arizona’s Mogollon Rim Country. You can count on Gail’s heroines to ask honest questions, act with integrity, grow in faith, and face hardships with spunk.

Connect with Gail :

http://www.gailkittleson.com/
http://www.facebook.com/GailKittlesonAuthor

http://amazon.com/author/gailkittleson

http://www.twitter.com/GailGkittleson @GailGkittleson

What fun finding out about Gail.

Readers, leave in the comments what was the most interesting or inspiring thing you read.