Creating a Writer’s Mission Statement

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For years I fought the notion of a mission statement. I’m a writer, not a company. Why on earth would I need one? And honestly, the idea of writing one was overwhelming. This past October I attended a writer’s conference and in one of my classes, we wrote our mission statements. It wasn’t as difficult as I’d first imagined. I see the value too. My mission statement reminds me of why I write and what I am focused on when I write.

Businesses create mission statements to tell the world what they’re all about in a few short lines. It’s a reminder to the organization of their goals in those few words. It’s the plum line of all they stand for.

As a writer, I need that same plumb line, so I don’t waste time writing anything that doesn’t match my mission statement. This statement reminds me of who I am.

Here is mine:

I believe your past doesn’t have to predict your future. As a writer who embraced a call, I didn’t feel worthy to fulfill I use my words and stories to give readers hope for new perspectives and new tomorrows providing a foundation of God’s love.

Before I could write my Mission Statement, I had to answer four questions. I’ve added my answers so you can see the process.

  1. What do you do with your writing?

I encourage, inform, and teach others with my articles and stories. My novels give hope that a person’s past doesn’t have to control their present or dictate their future.

      2)  Who do you do it for?

All those who want to mature in their writing and their faith.  Women read my novels and I hope the struggles of my characters are relatable.

      3) What makes you unique?

 I walked through this writing door with no formal education or college degree. I’ve taken the time to glean all I can through conferences and classes. Because God has given me the desire to encourage others to move forward, I share my writing journey in hopes they are inspired.

    4) What can your readers expect from you?

  Stories with characters that reflect real-life and relatable problems. Despite those problems, they learn to move forward.  Blog followers expect posts that give them hope for writing success. Posts that are uncomplicated and to the point.

I Believe

Begin your mission statement with the words I believe and based on the four questions above craft it. You’ll probably rewrite it a few times before you’ve tweaked it to a concise statement that inspires you every time you read it. This statement will remind you what your heart’s desire for your words.

Reminder and Focus

When I look at my mission statement, I am reminded of what I do and don’t write. I have no desire to write flat characters whose lives are easy and nothing ever goes wrong. That is not life. That has not been my experience. But neither am I comfortable writing dark prose that leave the reader with a shiver and looking under their beds. If I want them to shiver, I take them from the terror they face to healing balms of hope and overcoming before the story ends.

My mission statement keeps me focused on my purpose. And over the years just like Corporate America, we may feel the need to change our mission statement to reflect changes we sense in the writing industry and our writing niche. A mission statement isn’t meant to guide your whole life (but it might).

Changing

Writing trends change, and you may feel the need to change with them. At that point, a revised mission statement may be in order.

Care to share your mission statement in the comments/ I’d love to see it?