Returned Rights and Navigating the Writing Journey

By Dr. Martin Wiles

Martinheadshot

 

My rights have been returned!

Wait a minute. The rights for two books I signed over to the publishing company. The rights they accepted. Now, they were returning them. What exactly did that mean? That my two books would no longer be available? The separate year-long journeys I had made of edits and re-edits. The waiting game I had played—on design, on production—to finally hold a copy of my very own book and know I had written what lay inside the covers. All over.

I emailed my executive editor, a successful novelist, editor, and devotional writer. I needed comfort … reassurance. Was I finished as a writer?

“What they’ve done is typical,” she emailed back. “About two years is the life span for a devotional book. If it’s any comfort, they returned my rights too.” Mine had exceeded the norm. I guess something could be said for that.

 

Wait a minute. Did she say they had returned her rights? It shouldn’t have, but her statement made me feel better. If she—as a moderately successful writer—could have rights returned, then maybe … just maybe … I wasn’t finished as a writer after all.

A few months before receiving this news, I had learned about the fate of my first three books—published with another company. Perhaps I should have examined that entity more carefully, but I was a newbie to the publishing world. I hadn’t heard anything about royalties in a long time. When I googled my three books on Amazon, I noticed their prices scaled the roof.

I typed the publisher’s url address in my search bar. Nothing. So I asked god … the little god—Google. The company had been bought out by another company which declared bankruptcy shortly thereafter. The problem was, they had not returned the book rights of any author. Lawsuits ensued. Now my first three books are unavailable, and so are my last two.

 

Is there any saving grace in this dog-eat-dog world of publishing? Sure. Try another publishing company. I did, and I have another book in the works.

Grits Grace and God

I display a copy of each of my five books behind my desk in my classroom. Sometimes students remark, “You have written five books?” As if they wonder why I’m still teaching since I’m such a successful author. They’re too young to understand the writing world completely. The world where most writers—and other artists—starve if they quit their day jobs and try to do full-time what they love most in life.

So, what’s my advice to writers?

  • Dream of and work toward becoming a full-time writer, but in the meantime keep your day job. According to the Digital Book World and Writer’s Digest Author Survey taken in 2014, “Just over 77% of self-published writers make $1,000 a year…with a startlingly high 53.9% of traditionally-published authors, and 43.6% of hybrid authors, reporting their earnings are below the same threshold.”

 

  • Accept the fits and starts of the writing life. Continual writing assignments or book contracts might not come. I must make efforts to make them happen at all. But I’ve learned that about the time my spirits are low and I’m saying to my wife, “I’ve haven’t had anything accepted lately,” that I’ll get an email offering a writing assignment or wanting to accept a devotion I’ve sent.

 

  • Let rejection feed your determination. Even successful writers receive more rejections than acceptances. What makes the difference is their determination to keep writing and to keep sending their writing somewhere.

 

  • Release jealousy. Jealousy is perhaps the biggest temptation writers face. Each journey is unique. And if I’m a believer, God designs my journey, and I must be satisfied with my journey, while rejoicing over the journeys He sends others on. As writers, we’re not in competition. Enough room exists for us all.

So, put your pen (or pencil or keyboard) to paper, and get busy writing what presses heavily upon your heart.

About Dr.  Martin Wiles

Martin lives in Greenwood, SC, and is the founder of Love Lines from God. He is a freelance editor, English teacher, and author. He also serves as Managing Editor for Christian Devotions and as web content editor for Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas. He is the author of five books and has been published in numerous publications. His next book, A Whisper in the Woods: Quiet Escapades in a Busy World, in under contract with Ambassador International.

Check out his website:

www.lovelinesfromgod.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/martinwilesgreenwoodsc

Twitter: https://twitter.com/linesfromgod

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lovelinesfromgod

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/martin-wiles-5a55b14a

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/martinwiles

 

If you enjoy these writerly posts subscribe to Jubilee Writer and recieve new posts in your email.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Describing Acronyms while Writing Fiction

acronyms

At a recent critique session, the group was reviewing a chapter from my second unpublished novel, New Duet. Dan is a veteran, and while having dinner with Issy, he tells her about his truck being hit with an IED, mentioning his MOS while serving in the military. However, nowhere did I define what those acronyms meant. Defining IED (improvised explosive device) and MOS (military occupational specialty code) to my critique group help me realize I needed to make them clear to my reader. So within the dialogue exchange over dinner, Issy asked the questions one might ask in a casual conversation. Therefore, giving the definitions and making things clear rather than the archaic writing style of the narrator stepping in and saying, “Dear reader, let me explain what he is talking about.”

Obvious Acronyms

Some acronyms need no explanation. SWAT- everyone knows these are specially trained police in bullet-proof vests carrying assault weapons with particular skills to take down the bad guys. We know FBI, CIA, DEA. And every TV viewer now knows what CSI and NCIS stand for. Tests like MRI or CAT scan or CPR are understood either through experience or watching medical dramas.

Define so they stay engaged

Then again we can’t assume everyone knows. I recently ran across DIY. My mind went blank. But within the ad were the words do-it-yourself. Ah, sweet clarity. As writers, we should be familiar with the term WIP. But non-writers have no clue. Work in progress needs to appear somewhere in the same paragraph for clarity.

If you are writing about a specific trade the acronyms need to be defined once either before or after its first use. Otherwise, readers are confused and leave your story to google the mystery letters. Too many of those and you’ve lost the momentum of turning pages to get to the end at 2 a.m.

My example

As you craft your story, don’t forget to define terms within the story as quickly as you can without drawing the reader out of the story.  If a DEA agent comes to the door, don’t stop to give a brief history of the Drug Enforcement Agency. Instead:

“Men, are in position, sir.” The tall lanky DEA agent looked to Detective Marshall for confirmation.

“Tell the men to move in. Slowly. Don’t want to spook these guys.”

“For sure, they’ve given us the slip more than once. “The agent keyed his mike. “Move in, low and slow.”

“If they flush the drugs, our case is toast.” Detective Marshall kept his eyes on the third story window. Three guys sat at a table. What they were doing could not be seen from his vantage point. Fear moistened his collar. He hated dealing with drug smugglers. It always brought in the feds, and more hands in the pie could end badly.

“I heard from a guy in Vice over at Precinct 23 that these guys operate in four states.”  The young detective moved closer with the declaration. Marshall wasn’t in the mood to chat.

“Well, today it stops here.” Withdrawing his Glock from its holster, he moves in a squat posture toward the building.

Now in this less than stellar scene you get the idea. I have given you the information that the DEA is a federal branch of law enforcement that deals with drug-related crime. I’ve given the reader the needed info without stepping away from the scene.  Always give just enough to define the acronym but not so much as to drag the reader from the action.

What interesting acronyms have you run across? Do you have an example of how yuo defined an acronym while still moving the story along?

Please sign up for my blog I’d love to hear your comments on my posts. 🙂

 

 

Finding Weeds in Your Word Garden

 

dsc_0272crop-copy

Photo by Charles Huff

How many of you love gardening? Seeing your landscape creation take shape, watching the bulbs you painstakingly planted bloom in glorious, magnificent colors. Now, how many of you love weeding?  Getting down on hands and knees and ripping out those menacing thistles, dandelions, grass, stray saplings, and (if you have a neighbor who feeds squirrels) corn stalks. Well, if we were in a gardeners class, I’d be the one hiding behind the big kid, hoping to avoid getting volunteered.

 

 

dsc_1082

Photo by Charles Huff

I love a beautiful garden but hate, HATE weeding! The whole process makes my arms and shoulders ache and my fingernails acquire black French tips just thinking about it. Needless to say, my yard gets pretty weedy before it is attended to. Over the years, my landscaping has become pretty Spartan.

 

A writer’s garden of words needs weeding, and that can become a pretty daunting task, too. Especially for the novice. It’s like sending a four-year-old into your flower beds to weed. They know not what to pull so they remove a lot of healthy foliage. If her eyes are green, don’t keep telling me her eyes are green. He gazed into her green eyes. Or, Her green eyes snapped. Maybe those eyes blaze like an emerald when she’s angry. Still green but more exciting.  Her pupils grew large when the villain approached. See what I’m getting at?

Does your hero fist his hands a lot? Or run them through his hair? (Mine sure did.)  Flex fingers, white knuckles, clenched-fisted. Find more interesting ways to refer to physical action.

dsc_0123landscapecrop-copy

Some varieties of flowers come in different sizes. Daisies can be small, tall, bushes and a myriad of colors. Daisies are my favorite flower, but I would not want my whole yard covered in them. Neither does your reader want to read the same word over and over again. Rather than your hero breathing try panting, gasping or straining. His breathing might be thready, heavy, faint or gulping. You might write:

The thready sound of air passed through his teeth.

A whisper of air tickled her neck.

My editor found a lot of sipping going on in my novel. So we had to weed those sips out. My characters held the mug to their lips. Stirred the content. She gazed over the cup. Gulped, swallowed, savored and drank.

Don’t walk across the room. Stride, skip, stomp, waltz, plod or any other action word.

We use lots of was, were, is, are in our writing. She was sad might transform to sadness gripped her. If it gripped her heart in one paragraph be sure it travels to her toes or spills out her eyes later.

Thistles end up in my yard and flowerbeds because of the Cardinal bird feeders in the neighborhood. When you think you’ve got them all, more pop up. Common words can become thistles. Just, only, have just, but, because, really, very and lots of -ly words.

 

dsc_1089

Photo By Charles Huff

 

When a thistle blooms, it is lovely. It’s the national flower of Scotland.  Most Americans don’t grow them intentionally. They are prickly and a nuisance when they pop up in random places. Do you recall listening to a speech sprinkled with the words: you know? Or have a friend end every sentence with –just saying. Make sure your word garden is free of those.

Below is a list of words to weed from the landscape of your novel. Words that distract the reader. The passive word that slows the action. Perhaps a favorite go-to word planted between awesome words causing the scenes to droop. These words distract the reader from the beauty of the overall work.

 

 

It is recommended by most authors I know to start your own list of words you habitually plant in your projects.  Refer to your list when you begin editing. Get out your weeding tools and eliminate the majority of them. Thin others. Not every was is unneeded and an occasional just is just fine.  Keep the list handy because those little buggers are going to reappear time and time again. And you will probably add to your list when you notice your replacement words become repetitive.

What are some favorite words you use in excess in your writing?

Subscribe to this blog in the right-hand column.

 

 

 

Populating Your Historical Story World

 

2ee88cf90ceda1ba0c21dd4a4e3d09e2

Notice the diversity in these cowboys.

I am a pantster, I write my stories as my characters speak to me. I don’t usually outline and sometimes characters appear I never met until the words appear on the page. During my research in preparation for my historical novel, I was fascinated by the various nationalities, who populated the geographic setting of my story. Because the information ruminated in the back of my mind, many minor characters took shape from those tomes.

 

Potpourri of ethnicity

During the mid -1800s significant immigration by many diverse people groups to the unsettled regions of the Midwest occurred.  African Americans came west after the Civil War. Former slaves looking to start new. Irish immigrants who’d help build the railroads and were sick of big city life in the East. Some who in order to gain citizenship fought in the Civil War on both sides. Chinese nationals helped build the railroad. Wikipedia places them only on the west coast. However, my resource books show they also moved inland. Not all Native Americans were on reservations either. And Mexicans were the first immigrants to the area under the Spanish flag.

All of these nationalities took up residence either on the ranch or the surrounding community in my novel, Secrets and Charades.

Research the nationality of your setting

 

thp-irish-csa

Irish immigrants. Notice the one in the union hat.

 

When populating your novel with characters, it’s important to know who settled the area. For example, did you know that most police officers and firemen in New York in the 1800s were Irish? Those jobs were considered dangerous. The Irish were treated as second-class citizens when they arrived on American shores. Some had military training, either in Ireland or were Civil War veterans. Because these jobs paid better than most available to the Irish, many took up the call. Often patrolling tenement areas housing Irish

irish-laundry-girls

Irish women took any job available. These washerwomen might have traveled west for a better life. My ancestors among them.

immigrants. So, it would be appropriate to have Irish police officers in your novel set in this time period in New York. Those same poor, abused Irish immigrants came west as farmers, miners and the like. The various free land opportunities gave them a chance for a better life.

 

139whm-blackhomesteader-copy

Former slaves on their homestead.

 

African-Americans

African Americans who had served during the Civil War also participated in homesteading opportunities. Former slaves with specific skills such as blacksmithing could make a living out west.  Black communities sprung up throughout the west. The stigmatism leftover from slavery made it safer to form their own communities.

 

vaqueros2

Mexican vaqueros taught the American cowboy many things.

 

 

Mexican -Americans

Mexican-Americans from the rich to the poor had to make room for many settlers. The poor Hispanics found work on ranches. Non-Hispanic cowboys learned their skills from these experienced vaqueros. Often the household staff on large ranches were Hispanic.

 

chinese-railroad-workers

Chinese railroad workers

 

Chinese

The Chinese usually create their own communities in a section of town. Their different dress, language, and culture put them under suspicion. Chinese were not permitted to bring their families with them. Although I don’t explore the seedier side of their communities in my novel, sadly there was one.  Rather I chose to paint them with a more compassionate brush. Asians have been part of American culture for hundreds of years. Besides, a key scene in Secrets and Charades would be impossible without my Chinese characters.

 

tumblr_inline_mr6na6qiiy1qz4rgp

Native Americans

 

Native Americans

Native Americans were ever present in the old west. Not all lived on reservations. Their life was hard, abuse at the hands of the white man is well-documented. Still, there are accounts of Indians and mix-race families living peacefully with white neighbors.

Less Vanilla

Knowing the culture of those who lived during the time you place your story can make the tale not only more believable but far more interesting to the reader. Don’t hesitate to add some color to your otherwise vanilla characters.ed1c1dd3bf71efd7db9ad9c540d4421a

Who are the characters that populate your story world?

If you’d like to continue following me please feel free to sign up in the right-hand column. you will receive new posts in your email each week.

 

 

 

Why Professional Headshots

cindy huff 2016If you follow me on Facebook, you’ve noticed I’ve changed my profile picture. I also posted two photos for my friends to help me choose which will go on the back of my novel. Headshots are essential if you take your writing seriously. It identifies you to future readers. So, it needs to be excellent quality. Whether you are traditionally or self-published, you need a professional headshot. Even if you haven’t gotten one item in print yet. Why would I need a photo if no one knows I write? To ask is to answer.

Business cards

You need it for your business cards so publishers, editors, agents and fellow writers can more easily connect. We all remember faces before we remember names. As I’ve mentioned in past posts, you will need business cards for conferences. But don’t wait until the last minute to get them. That might mean no photo which is not a good idea.cindy 2016

Publication pics

You need headshots for publications who want the photos of their authors with the article. Even e-zines request headshots. Selfies are tacky and scream amateur. It is better to send no photo than a selfie.  The photo embeds in people’s brains. They may be attracted to your book because your photo looks familiar. Torry Martin has funny photos. Comedians can get away with a bit of silliness. If comedy is your brand of writing, by all means, have a silly photo. Even that needs a professional hand to make it shine.

Poses

Your professional pose will appear on all your social media. Make sure it’s your best. Skip the “model” poses. You know what I mean. My six-year-old granddaughter strikes those poses the minute grandpa gets out his camera.

I once receive a business card from an up and coming writer with an odd photo. She was leaning sideways and her hair drooping in that direction. Her head at an awkward angle. Someone else noticed the photo while I was flipping through the business cards I’d received at the conference. They asked if the person was mentally challenged. So sad. Her latest photo is top-notch and speaks confident writer.

Update your photo

Over the course of my writing career, I have had five photos. The first one appeared in a column I wrote for the newspaper. I couldn’t find a copy to post here. That was back in the 90s before we had digital cameras.  It was face forward from the neck upward. Not very flattering if I recall. But face forward for a thumbnail picture is probably the best pose. The paper’s photographer took the picture and the paper chose the pose. Probably why I didn’t care for it.

Cindy1

First photo taken by Hubby

 

Years later I needed a photo for an article. Here is the one my hubby took. He takes great landscapes and tries to make sure the lighting is good when he photographs family members. This was taken with a simple digital camera. Not bad and I could crop it as a headshot pretty easily. It appeared on my Facebook page when I first got an account. Not professional but at least I’m dressed up an smiling.

 

Cindy_headshot

Second semi-pro photo

The second picture was taken by a young lady just getting into photography. Like the first—no touch ups and easy to crop. This replaced my FB picture and was the first pose on my blog. (If anyone knows how to delete old profile pictures permanently so they don’t reappear when I post my blog or Goodreads reviews on social media, message me.)

Small head shot of Cindy Huff

Cropped professional shot

 

My third headshot was done by a pro. He canceled his day of appointments and forgot to tell me. So, when I called and said I was waiting at his studio, he came and took them anyway. The happy ending is he gave all the proofs to me for free for the inconvenience he caused. There was no touch up here either.

My most recent headshots are below. These are my two favorites from my professional photo shoot. These have been touched up.

Copyrights

I have all the rights. This is important. I can make a zillion copies, place them on anything I want. They are mine and not the photographers. These photos will be used for whatever advertising my marketing people will deem prudent.  Retail store photographer or those studios who focus on graduations, family photos come with watermarks. Legally I can’t make copies. Have you ever tried printing copies of your kid’s senior picture and found it less than satisfactory? Walmart and the like won’t reprint photos that are watermarked. Legal issues again.

Watermarks

These photographers want you to come back to them for copies. Copy sales are part of the meat and potatoes of their business. And there is nothing wrong with that. But for my purposes, the cost of purchasing additional pictures or working with their copyright license doesn’t work for me.

All Rights

I paid for my photo shoot, two photos, and touch-up from a very reputable photographer. He was so fun to work with. He tried a variety of poses and took several snaps to be sure he got the best picture possible. (Side note: Be sure to check references before taking the time and paying for the photo shoot.  And get quotes from more than one photographer.) He made sure the pixelation was suitable for any enlarging or reducing.  I can crop it to any size I want. I want to keep clear of violating any copyright issues, even by accident.

My photos span about 12 years, and I imagine I will be doing a few more updates before my career is over.

Headshot part of brand

DiAnn Mills mentioned in a conference class on social media that our headshot is part of our brand. She’s always wearing a turtleneck in her poses. I am not sure what my brand is. Notice in each photo I am wearing a different color. But, all of them are flattering. Flattering is always good. Some authors create a persona for their headshot. If they write westerns—a cowboy hat.  And as I mentioned silly poses for comedians. Jennifer Hudson Taylor writes Highland fiction so her back cover pose reflects that. Until I can wrap my head around the nuances of branding, I’ll probably stick with a professional pose with (hopefully) a confident smile.

 

DiAnn Mills shrunk (1)

DiAnn Mills

 

JenniferHTaylor-Celtic-Smal(1)

Author Jennifer Hudson Taylor

 

Do you have any tips about headshots or a fun story about your photo? Share it in the comments. I am confident there are things I have yet to learn about it.

 

 

From My Novel Research: Pioneer Schooling

McGuffey ReadersIn my novel, Secrets and Charades, there is no school close enough for 12-year old Juliet to attend. Like many pioneer children, Juliet was taught at home. McGuffey Readers were the standard text for children nationwide. These books were passed down from parent to child since it was first published in 1832. The 1st and 2nd readers introduced the basics. The 4th and 5th were geared toward 7th and 8th graders. Once a child completed these, they might end their education and seek work or continue on to higher learning.

The initial two became the standard for public schools until 1960.Within the pages were reading, phonics, spelling and grammar exercises. Many scriptural principles were taught as part of the reading lessons. The revised versions removed much of the religious teaching the McGuffey brothers felt so important for a well-rounded education.

Front of McGuffey ReaderUnfortunately, not all parents could read. Or at least not English if they were recent immigrants from Europe. Those settlers were willing to pay (even in produce) someone to teach their children. Often it was an older daughter of one of the settlers who had completed her own education using these same readers.

Parents would send books from home with their children to use in the classroom. Usually Bibles, Sunday School quarterlies, dictionaries, poetry books and McGuffey’s.  Books were shared. Students took turns reading out loud. I read of a classroom set up in an abandoned dugout—a house dug into the side of a hill. The students practiced ciphers and spelling by using sticks and the dirt floor.1882 Math book cover

Lots of calculating was done in their heads and answers were given orally. Math was not considered important for elementary students. Gradually math tables were introduced as part of their studies. Large cities often had more substance to their math curriculum.

Male students educations required more than reading. They needed a head for ciphers and neat penmanship to be considered employable. All the answers were found in the back of the textbook enabling anyone to teach themselves math.

Education for girls was minimalized with the focus of teaching her own children or perhaps a classroom when she grew up.

A community felt more civilized if they were able to build a church and a school. Often one building served both purposes.1880 Arithmatic book

Fortunate was the child whose parents could read and write. Winter days the children spent studying while Ma sewed and Pa repaired tools he would need in the spring, Learning took place in snatches when the family wasn’t doing other work crucial to their survival.

A school established in a rural area accommodated harvest and planting times. Short sessions allowed the boys to help in the fields. Older girls and small children might continue to attend school while their older brothers were absent.

McGuffey readers are still sold today. Homeschoolers used them to experience a bit of history.

Hope you enjoyed this interesting factoid from my research. What interesting things have you found out as you’ve researched your latest writing project?

Feel free to subscribe to my blog if you would like to receive Writer’s Patchwork in your email.

Spine and Interior Design-oh Yes

 

20160801_162851

Check out the spines on my husband’s bookshelf   Photo by Charles Huff

 

Recently I shared two posts about cover design. Front cover and back cover. There are two other design features to consider. One is really obvious, and I’ve mentioned it before in a previous post. The other was new to me. Yet, I see it every time I open a book.

Spine

When searching for books at the library we read the spines. Unless additional funds have been paid for placement, most books are shelved spine out. Be sure the spine of your book is easy to read and pleasing to the eye. Colors should match the cover but not overwhelm the font color. Examine the books you have on hand and you will see clearly which ones follow that guideline. Publishers may or may not allow you to make decisions on the spine.  Enough said on this subject.

Interior Design

Here is something I hadn’t even realized was a choice before. Open a novel and look at the layout inside. The title page, copyright and licensing page, acknowledgments, table of content. All of this front matter is part of interior design. In addition, how each chapter and page is typeset is part of interior design. Publishers often have different layouts based on genre. Again look at those books you pulled out to check the spine. Examine the pages.

Another easy way to see various designs is on Amazon. Click on the book cover to look inside.  This is an option to read a portion of the book before you purchase it. For our purpose, it gives us a chance to examine the layout of the book.

The design may affect the readability of the story. Personally, I dislike reading chapters that begin with Large first letters—especially the ornate variety.

Medievle Alphabet

Sometimes I am unsure what the letter is and pause to figure it out. I’ve noticed the fancy fonts don’t seem to format well in e-books. At least that has been my experience.

Take some time to look at some of the interior designs—both paper and e-book versions—of your favorite authors. How does it affect your reading enjoyment?

It’s so nice to be included in these prepublication decisions.

I share this new choice with you so when your time comes to make these decisions, you’ll be more enlightened about what you feel looks best. Even if your publisher might not give you a choice, it’s a good thing to know. For the self-publishing author this decision is all on you.

 

Please share your insights with me on your pre-pub journey inquiring minds want to know. J

Please feel free to subscribe to this blog to continue to follow my writing journey and that of other wonderful writers. Go to the right column to subscribe so you don’t miss a new post.

 

 

 

 

Creating Back Cover Copy

The cover design is more than the front cover. In my last post, I shared the steps an author needs to take to help the art department create an awesome design and showed you lots of wonderful front book covers. Now let’s look at the second part of the cover design. It goes beyond the picture representing your story. A prospective reader who finds your cover fascinating will flip over to the back. This content will determine if the reader opens the book and takes it to the checkout counter.

The form I received from my publisher for cover design included sections for the back cover. My book’s back cover will have a blurb about the story, my bio, and a head shot.

Blurb

Here is my present draft. It will probably get tweaked before the final draft. This same blurb will appear on Amazon and my publisher’s website. Short, concise and intriguing are the keys to a good blurb.

Jake Marcum’s busy ranch leaves him no time for courting, and his wounded heart has no place for love. Battlefield nightmares add to his burden, but his tomboy niece, Juliet, needs taming, and a mail-order bride seems the logical solution. When an inheritance threatens to reveal a long-buried secret, Dr. Evangeline Olson abandons her medical practice and travels west to become Jake’s mail-order bride.

Jake soon realizes Evangeline is more than he bargained for, especially when her arrival causes a stir in the community. As the two try to find their way in a marriage of convenience, they are faced with cattle rustling and kidnapping. Will they be able to put aside their differences and work together to save the ranch and their fragile relationship?

 

Biography

My biography will only be a few sentences. I’m meeting a potential reader, not a boss. I pulled a few books from my to-be-read pile and studied their bios. Each part of the biography encourages the reader that the author may be worth checking out.

Bio components

  • Taglines are something that defines what you write.

Cynthia Ruchti-tells stories hemmed in hope.

DiAnn Mills- expect an adventure.

Brandilyn Collins- Seatbelt Suspense

  • Awards

Awards this manuscript has won

Awards past books have won

Awards the Author has won related to the subject matter of the book

Awards for personal accomplishments in a field other than writing

  • Past and present accomplishments

Former job

Present position

Degrees

  • Family
  • Pets
  • Fun vacation spots or any other fun comment 

 

Study the bios of your favorite authors or read the back cover of library books to get ideas. Those in your own genre may be slightly different from those in another genre. If you have no awards, don’t worry. Readers want to know you, and the last few items on a list can make your bio friendly and fun.

Endorsements

There may be an endorsement or two on the back as well. Endorsements are short words of praise about your book from other authors or people in the field you are writing about.

Color Design

The colors on the back cover will match or be identical to the front.

Professional Photo

And the finishing touch is a professional headshot. An up-to-date photo is key in maintaining a professional image. Professional photographers touch up flaws. Hey, who doesn’t want a flawless picture? My professional headshot is a few years old so I am getting a new one.Small head shot of Cindy Huff

Right now I’m interviewing photographers. I want all the photo rights to be mine to do with as I please. I’ll talk about that in a future post.

Next post

I’ve asked my awesome editor Andrea Merrill to share a guest post. She’ll be writing about the relationship between author and editor. Stop by Thursday to read her wonderful insights. You don’t want to miss it.

Speaking of not missing a post. Subscribe to this blog in the right-hand column and it will come to your e-mail. Thank you so much.

 

Why So Many Rounds of Edits After the Contract?

Today and in other posts until my book is published in March 2017 I thought I’d share the many behind the scenes activities that take place after the contract is signed. This is not a time to set back and relax. Oh no. Whether you publish traditionally or self-publish, there are many steps before you see your book on the shelf.

Rounds of edits

First, is edits. Even though my book was professionally edited before I submitted it, there are still things that need changing.

Pansy O'Hara Did you know that Margaret Mitchell called the heroine in Gone With The Wind, Pansy? The publishers didn’t like her name. So it was changed to Scarlett. And if you’ve read the book or seen the movie, she is Scarlett. The name Pansy doesn’t have the power and sensual premise.

 

For me, my first round of edits included rewriting a couple of scenes. I needed them to be from my main characters’ points of view not the minor characters. I actually found them more powerful after I was finished.

The first edit found typos and grammar errors that were missed  during my final rewrite. We found overused words and mannerisms. I liked Jake to run his fingers through his hair when he was frustrated, nervous or thinking. Well, needless to say it was a lot.

So, the editor’s job is to point those out so I can find new mannerisms. A repetitive mannerism can get on a reader’s nerves and pull them out of the story.

The second edit is to double-check what I fixed and find new stuff like character names interchanged. I recently read a book where the character’s name was Joel and his late brother was John. But in one scene the tagline John said was used. This was not a ghost story.  It should have been Joel. The editor may also question your research. And you may be asked to go back and fact check.

There are two more edits after that. Why so many? You don’t want a reader to review your typos on Amazon.

Beta Readers

Next, Beta Readers read through looking for typos and anything that might take the reader out of the story. I’ve had the pleasure of being a Beta Reader. You receive a PDF file of the book and open another document to record any boo boos you find. I understand you can have as many as 30 Beta Readers. This way, any blaring problems are fixed as well as the miniscule ones.

There will be one more round of Beta Readers. They might receive an Author review copy or an e-book version to read. In the new format other mistakes are found. The goal is a really clean copy. The reputation of the publisher is on the line along with yours.

Read it again

Here is the key for you as a writer. Every time you receive edits. Read. Read the sentence being edited. The paragraph. The page. The chapter. The whole novel. Read as much as you need to be sure the change flows. Read enough to ensure the edits have not changed the story.

You are the author and not every edit is the right choice. Please do accept typos, misplaced names. POV shifts, things like that. But there are other things you might say no to.  If someone felt a scene needed more sensory beats. The smell of the hot asphalt. The chirping of a robin. The snoring of the old man. You are the one who decides if that would add or distract from your story.

Author Review Copies

By the time you get to the second set of Beta Readers there’s very little to be pointed out. Possibly nothing at all. These readers are good candidates for pre-release book reviews.

Some publishers might not edit as thoroughly. They might only use one round of Beta Readers. I don’t know that there is a set formula. And if you self-publish you are going to have to find your own Beta Readers.These should be people who notice details and grammar errors.

Beware of editors who go through a minimal of steps. A wonderful story can be ruined by those little grammar, spelling and POV shift errors. I’ve seen them in printed copy of wonderful books. An e-book can be fixed. But a paper copy will hold on to those errors until a new print run. Not what you want at all.

In between receiving your edits to work on, you will be doing a lot of other things. Next post I’ll tell you what I learned about cover design.

What has been your editing experience?

 

Please subscribe to the right if you would like to receive Writer’s Patchwork on a regular basis.

 

Quiz, Quotes and Originality

Dove candy

I was eating Dove chocolates and trying to decide what to write for this week’s blog. As I unwrapped a few pieces, (I won’t say how many) the idea came to me. Each wrapper contains a quote. So here is my theme for today. Do you realize that all clichés started as original thoughts? I’ve created a list of quotes and I want you to guess the origins. Don’t peek at the answers until you’re done. Some of these are lines from movies, TV ads and books. This is a way to get you thinking about famous words and the point I will be making.

Can you guess the origin?

  1. What you see is what you get.
  2. .I’m Ok, You’re okay.
  3. Show me the money.
  4. Can you hear me know.
  5. Where’s the beef.
  6. You know what I’m sayin’.
  7.  Life is just a bowl of cherries.
  8. Life goes on.
  9. Love is never having to say you’re sorry.
  10. To be or not to be…
  11. Not so funny when the shoe is on the other foot.
  12. Not my circus, not my monkey.
  13. Come out smelling like a rose.
  14. A Rose by any other name would smell as sweet.
  15. The Force is with you.what You See -Dog

Answers:

  1. Comedian Flip Wilson as his character Geraldine
  2. Title of a self-help book by Thomas A. Harris
  3. Line from movie Jerry Maguire
  4. Verizon commercial
  5. Wendy’s commercial circa 1984
  6. Line from Trailer Park Boys, and We’re the Millers
  7. Popular song published in 1931
  8. Robert Frost (the original quote is much longer)
  9. Erich Segal novel Love Story
  10. Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  11. Uncertain (my internet search turned up no origin)
  12. Polish expression
  13. Popular in 1968. Before that it was worded Coming up Roses
  14. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
  15. Star Wars

Disclaimer: Some may have originated even earlier but I didn’t spend a lot of time double checking my sources because the origin isn’t the point of this post.

Beware Greek Warning

There is a point to this.

When you hear them, no further explanation is necessary.  The inference is clear. So, how many did you know? How many have you used?

I want to know what images do they evoke in your mind.  For example: “What you see is what you get ” as a reference to people speaks of nothing hidden here. It can be paired with “Take it or leave it.” If your character said this, what image does it project? An honest person? A person who doesn’t care to change?

How about “Not so funny when the shoe is on the other foot.” How often have kids heard this one from their parents.  We understand this to mean when you’re the one suffering the hard trial your perspective changes.

Two of the above quiz quotes I hate, and I want to smack anyone who uses them. Can you guess which ones?

“Not my circus, not my monkey.”  Strong, obnoxious I-do-not-care attitude about someone else’s problem.

And the dumbest one of all that speaks of immaturity and the free love era. “Love is never having to say you’re sorry.”  Does it bug you like it does me?

Don’t get all emotional on me.

All these quotes evoke emotions and paint pictures. And it’s easy as a writer to grab a familiar one to say what you want to say. Consider this: we are writers—we write; we create new phrases. We would love to see our words become premiere quotes on the tongues of generations to come. We also don’t want editors to mark up our work with red because we rely on clichés.

When the temptation comes to throw in an overused line, consider repurposing it a bit first. Rather than the noise in the room sounding like a swarm of bees, why not like a Nascar race?

My favorite Dove wrapper quote was a fun repurposing of the familiar. “Walk to the beat of your own tuba.”  What do you see when you read those words? Can you envision an individual who is content to be different? Maybe a nerdy type or someone who took up the tuba challenge when no one else would.

Now it’s your turn

Look at the clichés from my little quiz above or find your favorite and repurpose it to create a new word picture. Or you least favorite. J Here’s mine. “Love is never having to be someone you’re not.”

 

Share your repurposed quote in the comments or an original one.

 

Please follow me so I can continue to hear what you have to say about the things I chat about. Click in the right-hand column to subscribe.